Vegetarian Resource Group

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Are you searching for a new pair of vegan boots this winter? If so, there are many vegan online stores and storefronts offering a wide variety of boot styles.

Alternative Outfitters
https://www.alternativeoutfitters.com/
High and low-cut boots for women.

Bhava Studio
https://bhavastudio.com/
Women’s boots and booties in various styles including a hiking boot.

Blowfish Malibu
https://blowfishshoes.com/
Women’s boots.

Brave Gentle Man
https://www.bravegentleman.com/
Men’s casual, dress, and work boots.

Charmone Shoes
https://charmone.com/
They sell women’s boots.

Cri de Coeur
https://cridecoeur.myshopify.com/
Women’s low and high boots and botties.

Drizzle + Shine
https://www.drizzleandshine.com
Water resistant ankle boot.

Elizabeth Detroit
http://www.elizabethdetroit.com/
Boots for women.

Kat Mendenhall Boots
http://katmendenhall.com/
Men’s and women’s cowboy boots.

Mink
http://www.minkshoes.com
Custom faux fur boot.

MooShoes
https://www.mooshoes.com/
A wide variety of dress, work, rain, and snow boots for men and women.

Neuaura
http://www.neuaurashoes.com
Women’s dress and casual boots.

Pangea Vegan Products
http://www.veganstore.com/
Men’s hiking boots and women’s hiking and winter boots.

Reneu Shoes
http://www.reneushoes.com/
Boots for women.

Sudo Shoes
http://www.sudoshoes.com/
A wide variety of dress, work, rain, and snow boots for men and women.

Unicorn Goods
https://unicorngoods.com/
A wide variety of dress, work, rain, and snow boots for men and women.

Vegan Chic
http://www.veganchic.com/
A wide variety of dress, work, rain, and snow boots for men and women.

Vegan Scene
https://veganscene.com/
Women’s and men’s low boots.

The Vegetarian Site
http://www.thevegetariansite.com/index.htm
Men’s hiking and work boots and women’s work boot.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Through December 31, 2017, you can give a gift membership to The Vegetarian Resource Group (includes a 1-year subscription to Vegetarian Journal) for $15 each (40% discount). This offer is valid in the USA only!

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It’s a terrific way to share the vegan message, as well as support VRG. Gift subscriptions can be done online by simply paying $15 per gift and typing in your message and the address(s) of the gift recipient(s) in the comments field. Go to:
Gift Subscriptions

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Plant-Powered Famlies

Plant-Powered Families by Dreena Burton features over 100 family-friendly whole-food vegan recipes as well as helpful tips. You can start your morning off with Creamy Breakfast Rice Pudding, Savory Chickpea “Omelets,” Cinnamon French Toast, Double Chocolate Orange Banana Muffins, or Pumpkin Seed and Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Breakfast Bars.

Lunch fixes include Chickpea Nibbles, Simplest Marinated Baked Tofu, and Southwest Quinoa Salad, Red Lentil Hummus, Artichoke Spinach Dip, and Ultimate Cashew Cheese. For dinnertime you can prepare Smoky Bean Chili, Creamy Fettuccine, Hummus Tortilla Pizzas, Artichoke Sunflower Burgers, Home Fries, Apple Lentil Dal, and Ultimate Teriyaki Stir-Fry.

Sweet treat options are Pumpkin Chia Pudding, Crazy Brownies, “Nicer” Krispie Squares, Vanilla Bean Almond Butter Fudge, Fudgesicles, Chocolate Sweet Potato Cake, Dreamy Baked Bananas, and Apple Nachos Supreme.

You can order the book in The Vegetarian Resource Group Book Catalog. See:http://www.vrg.org/catalog/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Below is a list of some of the restaurants, caterers, and groups offering vegan meals/potlucks for Thanksgiving (both before and on that day) alphabetically by state. If you’re looking for some new recipes to prepare for Thanksgiving, visit: http://www.vrg.org/recipes/vegan_thanksgiving.php
We wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving!

ALASKA
Alaska Vegan Society, Palmer, AK
http://alaskaveg.org/OccasionalPages/ThanksgivingDinner.html

ARIZONA
Green New American Vegetarian, Phoenix and Tempe, AZ
http://greenvegetarian.com/thanksliving-2017

CALIFORNIA
Café Gratitude, CA (various locations)
https://cafegratitude.com/

Native Foods, CA (various locations)
https://www.facebook.com/NativeFoods/photos/a.165120935908.118928.110189285908/10155875439580909/?type=3&theater

Veggie Grill, CA (various locations)
https://www.veggiegrill.com/thanksgiving.html

Chico Vegans, Chico, CA
https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3118198

Akasha Restaurant, Culver City, CA
https://www.akasharestaurant.com/menu/thanksgiving-2017/

Real Food Daily, Los Angeles and Pasadena, CA
https://www.realfooddailyla.com/thanksgiving-to-go-menu

Raven’s Restaurant at The Standford Inn, Mendocino, CA
https://ravensrestaurant.com/ravens-thanksgiving-dinner-2017/

San Francisco Veg Society, San Francisco, CA
http://www.sfvs.org/events/#

The Gentle Barn, Santa Clarita, CA
http://www.gentlebarn.org/events/upcoming-events/a-gentle-thanksgiving-ca-2017

Bay Area Vegetarians, Vallejo, CA
http://www.bayareaveg.org/events.htm?EID=3149#3149

COLORADO
Native Foods, CO (various locations)
https://www.facebook.com/NativeFoods/photos/a.165120935908.118928.110189285908/10155875439580909/?type=3&theater

Vegan Society of Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO
https://www.meetup.com/CS-Vegan-Society/

WASHINGTON, DC
DC Vegan Catering, Washington, DC
https://www.facebook.com/dcvegancatering/photos/pb.544127152355587.-2207520000.1509386214./1200673493367613/?type=3&theater

FLORIDA
Sublime, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
http://sublimerestaurant.com/tg17/

ILLINOIS
Chicago Diner, Chicago, IL
https://chicago-diner-webstore.myshopify.com/

INDIANA
Fort Wayne Veg, Fort Wayne, IN
https://www.facebook.com/pg/fortwayneveg/events/?ref=page_internal

MARYLAND
The Vegetarian Resource Group Pre-Thanksgiving Potluck, Baltimore, MD
https://www.facebook.com/pg/thevegetarianresourcegroup/events/?ref=page_internal

Land of Kush, Baltimore, MD
https://www.facebook.com/pg/TheLandofKush/menu/

One World Café, Baltimore, MD
https://www.facebook.com/One-World-Cafe-191474677552909/

DC Veg Society, Bethesda, MD
http://www.vsdc.org/activities/thanksgiving/

Poplar Spring’s Thanksgiving with the Turkeys, Poolesville, MD
https://www.facebook.com/events/287314151467530/

MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire Vegan Network, Lenox, MA
http://www.all-creatures.org/bvn/events-20171023.shtml

MICHIGAN
Northern Vegans, Negaunee, MI
https://northernvegans.com/upcoming-events-2/

MINNESOTA
The Herbivorous Butcher, Minneapolis, MN
https://www.theherbivorousbutcher.com/collections/thanksgiving-feast

VIGOR, Rochester, MN
https://www.facebook.com/VegInformationGroupofRochester/

MISSOURI
The Gentle Barn, Dittmer, MO
http://www.gentlebarn.org/events/upcoming-events/a-gentle-thanksgiving-missouri-2017

NEW JERSEY
Good Karma, Red Bank, NJ
http://www.goodkarmacafenj.com/thanksgiving

NEW YORK
Chickpea and Olive, Brooklyn, NY
http://www.chickpeaandolive.com/

Woodstock Farm Sanctuary, High Falls, NY
http://woodstocksanctuary.org/category/events/

Blossom, New York, NY
http://www.blossomnyc.com/thanksgiving-2017/

The Cinnamon Snail, New York, NY
http://cinnamonsnail.com/thanksgiving-menu-2017/

Urban Vegan Kitchen, New York, NY
http://www.urbanvegankitchen.com/

Asha Sanctuary, Newfane, NY
http://www.ashasanctuary.com/thanksliving-celebration.html

Hudson Valley Vegans, Rhinebeck, NY
http://www.hvvegans.org/events–happenings.html

Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, NY
https://www.farmsanctuary.org/events/celebration-for-the-turkeys/

Animal Advocates of Western NY, Williamsville, NY
http://www.animalswny.org/events-activities

NORTH CAROLINA
Triangle Vegetarian Society Thanksgiving Dinner in Durham, NC
https://www.trianglevegsociety.org/thanksgiving/index.php

Wilmington Vegan, Wilmington, NC
http://wilmingtonvegan.com/

OHIO
Cleveland Vegan, Lakewood, OH
http://clevelandvegan.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Thanksgiving-Dinner-Night.pdf

OREGON
Veggie Grill, OR (various locations)
https://www.veggiegrill.com/thanksgiving.html

NWVeg, Portland, OR
http://nwveg.org/thanksgiving

PENNSYLVANIA
Miss Rachel’s Pantry, Philadelphia, PA
http://www.missrachelspantry.com/thanksgiving-2017/

Eden Cafe, Scranton, PA
https://www.facebook.com/edenavegancafe

TENNESSEE
The Gentle Barn, Knoxville, TN
http://www.gentlebarn.org/events/upcoming-events/a-gentle-thanksgiving-tennessee-2017

TEXAS
The Green Vegetarian Cuisine, San Antonio, TX
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-vegan-thanksgiving-feast-tickets-37592836185?aff=erelexpmlt

VIRGINIA
GreenFare, Herndon, VA
https://greenfare.com/event/celebrate-thanksgiving-at-greenfare-organic-cafe/

Vegetarian Society of Richmond, Richmond, VA
http://www.vegetarianrichmond.org/events/2017/11/23/vegan-thanksgiving-potluck

WASHINGTON
Veggie Grill, WA (various locations)
https://www.veggiegrill.com/thanksgiving.html

Café Flora, Seattle, WA
http://cafeflora.com/

Plum Bistro, Seattle, WA
http://plumbistro.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Plum-Bistro-Thanksgiving.pdf

WISCONSIN
The Green Owl Café, Madison, WI
http://www.greenowlcafe.com/events/

Citizens United for Animals, Milwaukee, WI
http://cufa-usa.org/event/2017-vegan-thanksgiving/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Better Bean Company produces Southwestern Pinto Beans, Uncanny Refried Black Beans, Tuscan White Beans, Cuban Black Beans, Roasted Chipotle Red Beans, Skillet Refried Red Beans, Better Baked Beans, and Three Sisters Chili.

Roasted-Chipotle-Bean-Dip-1

Go to https://betterbeanco.com/vegetarian-journal-readers/
Use code VRGBEANS to get a free sample!

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRGparentsandkids/ is intended to be a group that offers support for families raising children on vegan diets and for vegan kids. We envision it as a place to get advice about a wide-variety of topics: pregnancy, birthday parties, school lunches, Halloween, non-leather apparel, cruelty-free products, summer camps, and more. Please use it as a place to share your wisdom, seek advice, or just find a sympathetic ear. The goal is to offer support.

vrgbanner

Consequently, any profane, defamatory, offensive, or violent language will be removed. Feel free to disagree, but do so respectfully. Hateful or discriminatory comments regarding race, ethnicity, religion, gender, disability, sexual orientation, or political beliefs will not be tolerated. We expect that posts should relate to vegan diets and lifestyles. The Vegetarian Resource Group reserves the right to monitor all content and ban any user who posts in violation of the above rules, any law or regulation, SPAM, or anything otherwise off topic.

Recent discussion topics include:
Vegan treats to hand out at Halloween
Shared video on vegan pregnancy and raising vegan kids
Vegan camps
Plus much more!

Please share this information with any veggie families that you know! Thanks.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

Garbanzo

With over 20 locations mostly in Colorado but also in Texas, Virginia, Georgia, and Minnesota, Garbanzo offers several Mediterranean-inspired vegan menu options. See: http://www.eatgarbanzo.com/menu/

The Vegetarian Resource Group first spoke with Joe Chum, Director of Support Services at Garbanzo, in May 2017. We noted a few changes in their website soon after and followed up with Joe between June and October 2017.

Based on our multiple phone discussions and emails, we generated the following list of Garbanzo’s vegan menu options (excluding raw vegetables) according to the website menu scrolling from top to bottom:

Vegan Menu Options at Garbanzo
•pita bread* (white, wheat, gluten-free)
•tortilla* (white)
•falafel
•portobello mushrooms
•original hummus
•seasonal hummus
•tabbouleh salad
•tomato cucumber salad
•seasoned rice
•baba ganoush
•cilantro sauce
•red chili sauce
•Greek vinaigrette*
•tahini sauce
•homemade fries
•homemade chips
*Item contains sugar although information received from this chain differed during the months The VRG was conducting research. In the list above, the latest information obtained during October 2017 is presented. See Q&A below for more information.

According to page 5 of Garbanzo’s allergen sheet the Mediterranean garlic sauce contains egg (mayonnaise) and the Tzatziki sauce contains milk (yogurt). See:
http://www.eatgarbanzo.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/16-2300506_garbanzo_allergen_sheet_04-2016.pdf

In May 2017, Joe told us:
•“The pita bread does not contain milk.”
•“The seasoned rice used to contain chicken broth but it no longer does.”
•“There is no L-cysteine in the pita bread.” (L-cysteine is a dough conditioner that is most often derived from poultry feathers although microbial alternatives exist).
•“The flatbread contains dry milk.”
•“The portobello mushrooms are prepared in their own sauté pan away from meat products.”

Garbanzo’s Grab & Go Menu
Also in May 2017, Joe informed us that the Vegetarian Wrap on the Grab & Go menu (see their allergen sheet given above) “is usually made with the white or whole wheat tortilla and anything can go in it,” stated Joe. [VRG Note: In October 2017, Joe told us that Garbanzo offers only white tortillas.]

Also on the Grab & Go menu are
•Hummus & Veggie Snack Pack
•Greek Vegetarian Salad
[VRG Note: In September 2017, Joe told us this about the Greek Vegetarian Salad: “We no longer offer this item. It was just salad with Greek Vinaigrette dressing.”]

The VRG: Which bread is used for the Mediterranean Wrap?
Garbanzo: Usually tortilla bread is used.

The VRG: Is the flatbread ever used for the Mediterranean Wrap?
Garbanzo: Usually tortilla bread but if the locations use flat bread, sugar is in the flat bread.

The VRG: Are white or whole wheat tortillas available to make the Mediterranean burrito?
Garbanzo: Yes, but it depends on location. In general, only white is available.

Microingredient Questions for Garbanzo
The VRG: Is there any added sugar in the Greek vinaigrette (including sugar in its components)?
Garbanzo: There is sugar in the Greek vinaigrette.

The VRG: Is there any dairy including whey, casein, etc. in the Greek vinaigrette?
Garbanzo: There is no dairy in the Greek vinaigrette.

The VRG: Is there any added sugar in the baklava (including sugar in its components)?
Garbanzo: There is no sugar in the baklava but there is honey.

The VRG: Is there any dairy including whey, casein, etc. in the baklava?
Garbanzo: Yes, there is dairy in the baklava.

The VRG: Is there any added sugar in the tortillas?
Garbanzo: No.

The VRG: Is L-cysteine used as a dough conditioner in the tortillas?
Garbanzo: No.

The VRG: Does the seasonal hummus vary from time to time?
Garbanzo: Yes.

The VRG: If so, could there be dairy such as feta cheese in the seasonal hummus?
Garbanzo: There’s no plan to use feta cheese in our seasonal hummus at the moment. We are very careful on adding dairy to any of our menu items.

The VRG: Does your feta cheese contain rennet, an animal-derived enzyme? If not, what is its enzyme source?
Garbanzo: From our supplier (manufacturer): “Microbial enzymes and an animal lipase are used in the manufacturing of the [feta cheese].”

The VRG: Could there ever be animal ingredients or flavors in the seasonal hummus?
Garbanzo: No. We try to maintain most of our items to be gluten-free or vegan or at least vegetarian.

The VRG: You stated that there was no milk in the pita. Is there whey or any other dairy ingredient?
Garbanzo: There is no dairy in the pita.

The VRG: Is there added sugar in the pita?
Garbanzo: Yes. There has to be sugar to feed the yeast.

The VRG: Is the falafel deep fried in fresh oil away from all meats?
Garbanzo: Yes. We don’t use the fryers for any meat or animal products.

The VRG: Is the baba ganoush an all-vegetable dish?
Garbanzo: Yes, it has only roast eggplant purée, tahini, garlic, and salt.

The VRG: Is your sugar from sugar cane, beet sugar or some combination? [Note: Non-USDA Certified Organic cane sugar may have been processed through cow bone char.]
Garbanzo: Our sugar is from beet.

We followed up in June-October 2017 with these questions and emails.

The VRG: Are the gluten-free pita and the gyro pita all-vegan? No L-cysteine, whey, honey or other animal-derived ingredients in either of them?
Garbanzo: Gyro is not; pita is vegan.

The VRG: Is it true that you now offer the following breads:
•pita
•gluten-free pita
•gyro bread
•flatbread (some locations)
•tortilla (white, whole wheat)
Garbanzo:
•pita Yes
•gluten-free pita Yes
•gyro bread Same as Flatbread below
•flatbread (some locations) Correct
•tortilla (white, whole wheat) White only

The VRG: Which, if any, contains dairy including whey, casein or their derivatives?
Garbanzo: Flatbread

The VRG: Which, if any, contains sugar?
Garbanzo: They all have sugar.

The VRG recommends contacting this chain directly if diners have any additional questions for further clarification. Note that ingredients at all restaurants can change over time and there may be conflicts with what is on the website.

The contents of this posting, our website, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

For information on other restaurant chains, see:
www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

For information on vegetarian and vegan restaurants throughout the USA and Canada, see:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Alex Hershaft is one of the few remaining voices who can personally and vividly attest to the experience of the Holocaust. And he is one of the only such voices who can undeniably relate that experience to the plight of farm animals.

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Alex has told his dramatic story in front of large crowds in Baltimore, Pittsburgh, New York City and most recently Philadelphia. This will be an opportunity to experience his presentation in Washington D.C.

Tickets include:
•A reception with delicious vegan hors d’oeuvres.
•Alex’s presentation about his moral evolution from Holocaust survivor to farm-animal advocate.

“As a Holocaust survivor with a riveting and inspirational personal story, he adds to that a unique and incredibly powerful perspective and voice on the rights of animals not to be raised for food. I wish everyone could hear the presentation that I did.” — Richard Levin, attendee, “From the Warsaw Ghetto to a Life of Compassion,” May 15, 2015, Baltimore, MD.

Event information:
Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 6:30 p.m.
Sixth & I, 600 I St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001
Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door; see:
https://www.givedirect.org/donate/event.php?cid=13438

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Are you looking for some alternatives to Turkey this Thanksgiving? Fortunately, there are many options today.

Celebration Roast

Field Roast offers three choices:
1. Celebration Roast with Traditional Bread Stuffing and Gravy – made with fresh onions, celery, cranberries and butternut squash.
2. Hazelnut Cranberry Roast en Croute – a rich, hazelnut-infused grain meat stuffed with Field Roast sausages, crystallized ginger, cranberries and apples – wrapped in a savory puff pastry. It’s even Toaster Oven friendly!
3. Smokey Forager’s Roast – mushrooms, wild huckleberries, and rice stuffing wrapped in a rich smokey tomato grain meat seasoned with spices.
See: http://fieldroast.com/product-family/roasts-loaves/

Hilary’s is offering an exclusive Holiday Stuffing. It is vegan and gluten-free. The ingredients include a blend of organic millet, leafy greens and hemp seeds together with celery, apple, parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
See: http://www.hilaryseatwell.com/products/holiday-stuffing/

Tofurky offers Tofurky Roast and Gravy. The Roast includes stuffing. For details see: http://www.tofurky.com/what-we-make/holiday/feast/

Gardein sells a Savory Stuffed ‘Turkey,’ a Holiday Roast, and Turk’y Cutlet. For more information see: www.gardein.com

Vegetarian Plus offers a Vegan Whole Turk’y with Gravy and Stuffing. For details see: http://vegetarian-plus.com/product/all-natural-vegan-whole-turkey/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Summer_2_-_Lentils_and_Veggies_resized

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

Announced in July 2017, Starbucks adds a Vegan Lentils & Vegetables Protein Bowl with Brown Rice to its year-round menu in select San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, New York City, and Washington, D.C. locations. See:
https://news.starbucks.com/facts/whats-new-at-starbucks-this-summer

The bowl features black lentils and brown rice along with butternut squash, kale, broccoli, cabbage, beets, peas and green onion along with roasted tomatoes, red bell pepper and sunflower seeds. It is served with lemon-tahini dressing.

Starbucks new menu item replaces the Hearty Veggie & Brown Rice Salad Bowl.
Nutrition and ingredient information about this entrée appear on Starbucks’ website: https://www.starbucks.com/menu/food/bistro-boxes/lentils-vegetable-protein-bowl-with-brown-rice

Ingredients:
cooked brown rice (water, brown rice, olive oil [refined olive oil, extra-virgin olive oil]), black lentils (water, black lentils), lemon tahini dressing (water, sesame seeds, extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice concentrate, reduced sodium tamari soy sauce [water, soybeans, salt], parsley, agave syrup, toasted sesame oil, cilantro, salt, garlic, paprika, natural flavor), kale, broccoli, butternut squash (squash, olive oil [refined olive oil, extra-virgin olive oil]), beets, cabbage, peas, roasted tomato (tomatoes, canola oil, garlic, vinegar, salt, spices), roasted sunflower seeds (roasted sunflower seeds, [sunflower, canola or cottonseed oil], salt), roasted red bell pepper, green onion.

Alli from Starbucks Media Relations replied by email to a few additional questions The Vegetarian Resource Group had.

The VRG: Is there any added sugar?
Starbucks: The dressing has one gram of added sugar in the form of agave syrup.

The VRG: Can you confirm that the natural flavors in the lemon-tahini dressing are not sourced from animal-derived ingredients?
Starbucks: We can confirm the flavor is not from animal-derived ingredients.

The VRG: Are this bowl and all of its ingredients prepared away from all meats?
Starbucks: Our salads and sandwiches are prepared in a manner that prevents cross contact with other menu items.

The contents of this posting, our website, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

For information about vegetarian and vegan restaurants, visit
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

For more information about chain restaurants, visit
http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Are you looking for some new ideas to prepare dishes featuring apples and/or pears? If so, we are sharing recipes from previous articles in Vegetarian Journal.

apples and pears

Perfect Pears
Debra Daniels-Zeller offers these pear recipes:

Reisling-Braised Kale and Pears With Basmati Rice
Sweet And Spicy Yams And Pears With Toasted Pecans
Maple-Sautéed Pears
Creamy Rosemary, Acorn Squash, and Pear Soup
Coconut-Cranberry-Pear Sauce
Hazelnut-Orange Asian Pear and Beet Salad
Pear Crisp With Cranberries
Pear-Walnut Bread
Berry-Poached Pears

Fabulous Apple Desserts
Jacqueline Dunnington provides these apple-based recipes:

Poached Apples
Raw Fruit Slices with Spiced Apple Syrup
Baked Apples in Maple Syrup
Swiss-Style Apple Dessert
Apple Fantasy
Apple and Apricot “Soup”

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Whether you’re a vegan living alone or the only vegan in your family, Vegan for One by Ellen Jaffe Jones with Beverly Lynn Bennett is meant for you. Helpful tips are provided along with delicious vegan recipes. For breakfast try Buttermilk Pancakes, Breakfast Potato-and-Veggie Skillet, or Maple, Apple, and Pecan Waffles. Next, move on to snacks such as Sweet Cinnamon Baked Tortilla Chips and Sauces and Gravies including Spicy Peanut Sauce and Cashew Cheese Sauce.

VEGAN FOR ONE_front cover_lo-res

Delicious salad options are offered including Creamy Ranch-Dressed Potato Salad, Taco Salad, and Sesame Slaw. And you can serve one of these salads with a soup such as Miso Noodle Soup or Roasted Butternut Bisque.

For lunch try Seitan Street Tacos, Classic BLT, or Tofu and Slaw Spring Rolls. For dinner, start with a delicious side dish such as Roasted Cauliflower, Sesame Noodles, Indian-Style Millet, or Candied-Ginger Baby Carrots. Main dish options include Curried Lentils with Spinach, Mac-n-Cheese, Barbecue Tofu or Tempeh, and Deconstructed Veggie Lasagna. Finally, end your meal with one of these outstanding desserts: Rich and Chewy Brownies, Silken Berry Pudding, or Caramel-Almond Blondies. Dining solo never has to be boring again!

You can order this book today from The Vegetarian Resource Group here:
Vegan for One

The Vegetarian Resource Group offers a wide range of vegan books in their book catalog including: Vegan Brunch, Vegan Soul Kitchen, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, The Indian Vegan Kitchen, Teff Love, Food Allergy Survival Guide, Artisan Vegan Cheese, plus many other titles.

Visit VRG’s entire book catalog here:
VRG Book Catalog

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


The Vegetarian Resource Group just celebrated its 35th Anniversary and 2017 has been a very productive year. Support through Combined Federal Charity (CFC) or your Local/State Campaign is greatly appreciated! You can also donate directly to VRG at www.vrg.org/donate

CFC

Here’s a sampling of some of our recent accomplishments and outreach:
– VRG started a new Parents/Kids Facebook Group. To join see: https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRGparentsandkids/

-VRG’s Food Service Advisor, Nancy Berkoff, did a presentation in Fargo, North Dakota at a regional meeting of the National Association of College and University Food Services. Nancy also consulted for a company in Russia who is looking to increase the availability of plant-based milks in Moscow.

-We continue to work with numerous High School and College interns in our Baltimore office including future vegan Registered Dietitians. VRG Nutrition Advisor Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, mentors those interns who are interested in pursuing a career in nutrition. VRG staff also works with students that are majoring in Journalism, Business, etc. Among their tasks are staffing VRG booths throughout the USA, preparing vegan meals for homeless individuals, reviewing new vegan products (someone has to do that tough job!), writing up entries for our online restaurant guide, reviewing scientific studies on vegan diets, plus so much more. These students are the future of the vegan movement and we should all be excited about what they will bring to the cause once they graduate.

-VRG assisted media (print, web, radio, tv, etc.). The Associated Press interviewed VRG’s Nutrition Advisor, Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, on vegan babies; Reed also updated information on veggie pregnancies on BabyCenter.com. Reed was quoted in an Issue of Consumer Reports in an article titled, “Healthy Shopping Strategies for Vegans.” A reporter from NACS Magazine interviewed VRG Co-Director Debra Wasserman for a trends column about how convenience stores can respond to the growth of consumers who are vegetarian and vegan. A Wall Street Journal writer contacted VRG for data on veganism/vegetarianism in the USA and how it compares to 20 years ago.

– The Vegetarian Resource Group has done numerous outreach booths this year including Leg Up Farmers Market in York, PA; Farm Animal Rights Conference in VA; Charlottesville and Richmond, VA VegFests; Vegan SoulFest in Baltimore, MD; DC GreenFest; Veggie Pride Parade in NYC; DC VegFest; Ashville, NC VegFest; New England VegFest in Worcester, MA; Baltimore VegFest; Jain Conference in Edison, NJ; Western NY VegFest in Buffalo, NY; World VegFest in San Francisco, CA; New Jersey VegFest in Secaucus, NJ; and Central Pa VegFest in Lancaster, PA. We will soon be at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in Chicago, IL; Everett Community College Food Day in WA; and more locations.

-The Vegetarian Resource Group provided vegan handouts free-of-charge for outreach in a wide variety of locations including 500 Save Our Water and 500 My Vegan Plates to Charleston Veggies & Vegans for outreach; 200 Vegan Diets in a Nutshell, 200 Vegan Teen brochures, 200 Vegan Pregnancy brochures, and 200 My Vegan Plates to Columbia, SC for an Affordable Vegan Foods Workshop; sent 300 My Vegan Plates, 300 Vegan Diets in a Nutshell, and 100 Spanish brochures to Kalamazoo Vegans for tabling; sent 200 handouts to Nutrition Services @ St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital; Sent to Vegan Society of PEACE for tabling in Katy, TX: 600 Vegan Diet in a Nutshell, 300 Save our Water, 300 Vegan Nutrition for Teens, 600 Vegetarian Journals; sent 200 My Vegan Plates to Food Not Bombs DE; sent 200 My Vegan Plates, 74 Vegan Diets in a Nutshell and another 150 handouts to be handed out at The Gayton Kirk Church in Richmond, VA, etc.

Your support is greatly appreciated! You can donate directly to VRG at www.vrg.org/donate

You can also mail donations to The Vegetarian Resource Group, PO Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203 or call in your donation to (410) 366-8343 Monday through Friday 9am to 5pm EST.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Oasis Vegan Veggie Parlor

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Eureka Compass Vegan Food
629 Aldine St.
St. Paul, MN 55104
Even non-vegans love Eureka Compass Vegan Food! Eureka serves farm-to-table food, featuring unique creations such as Green Onion Pancakes, Garbanzo Bean and Spaghetti Squash Tacos, and Roasted Veggie Tamales! They also have gluten free options. Outdoor seating available.

Healthy Harvest Urban Farms
1616 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL 61201
Healthy Harvest Urban Farms has classic menu items such as a vegan BLT, Chili, and wraps. They offer specialty sandwiches like the smashed bean and avocado sandwich. Their menu is seasonal so be sure to check their Facebook for changes and updates.

La Taqueria Vegiee
Grape St. & Fern St.
San Diego, CA 92102
La Taqueria Vegiee food truck is located in the Target parking lot and serves Mexican dishes. The Ensenada taco is made with Portobello mushrooms and spices and is a clear menu favorite. Their “Carne Asada” taco has a realistic texture and taste. All the tacos are packed with flavor. The tortas are also highly recommended.

Oasis Vegan Veggie Parlor
340 Washington St.
Dorchester, MA 02121
Oasis Vegan Veggie Parlor has great food and a great vibe! Mac n “Cheese” is a very popular entrée and so is the BBQ Vegan “Chicken.” The menu changes often so be sure to check in regularly.

Onion Maiden
639 Warrington Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15210
This heavy metal, punk rock inspired food purveyor takes plant-based eating to a new stratosphere. Each dish is 100% cruelty free, including their sugar source and local ingredients are used when available. Dish names such as, Kale ‘ Em All, The Roots and Bunn O))), are both musically inspired and sure to be a deliciously bold, fresh and fun concert of flavor to the palette.

Plant Wise
15 East Deer Park Rd.
Dix Hills, NY 11746
Plant Wise offers a variety of wraps, salads, and bowls. Rolls are also available and come served in a nori sheet. They also offer combo meals, fresh juices, smoothies, and organic teas and coffees.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Vegan in Volume is published by The Vegetarian Resource Group and has been greatly received by people working in the food service sector, as well as those that enjoy throwing parties in their own home or simply cooking in volume. This book by Chef Nancy Berkoff, EdD, RD offers 125 vegan recipes serving 25. It also offers a lot of helpful advice including A Fast Course in Vegan Nutrition, The Mechanics of the Operation, Food Safety Pointers, and a section on Vegan Ingredients.

vegan in volume

The quantity recipes greatly vary depending on the audience you’ll be serving. Nancy includes recipes for breakfast such as Lots of Grains Pancakes and Peachy Keen Breakfast Crumble. A section for kids serves up Squiggly Noodles and “Not-Meatballs.” For dinner parties and elegant dining for adults try French Onion and Olive Tart and Eggplant “Caviar.”

You will also find quantity recipes for special occasions such as weddings, anniversaries, birthdays, bar/bat mitzvahs, communions, and more. Enjoy Watermelon Gazpacho, Spicy Bean Cakes with Fruit Salsa, Curried Vegetables with Polenta, and Sophisticated Poached Pears. Next, move on to college campuses and try Vegetable Tagine, Two Alarm Four Bean Chili, Jumpin’ Veggie Jambalaya, and Gooey, Chewy Peanut Butter Bars.

Grab and Go Fast Food recipes include Sweet Potato Burgers, Cold Noodles with Peanut Sauce, and Fragrant and Fast Tofu Sandwich. Un-Hospital Food items include Orange and Wild Rice Salad, Sweet Potato Soup, New England Baked Beans, Eggplant Lasagna, and Cinnamony Baked Apples. And a section for senior citizens includes recipes for Chesapeake Corn Chowder, Southwest Tomato Rice, Pasta with Vegetable-Marinara Sauce, and Homestyle Molasses Cookies.

Vegan in Volume can be purchased from The Vegetarian Resource Group Book Catalog: http://www.vrg.org/catalog/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Please book mark and use this link. Eligible shopping will support our vegan education and activism. http://smile.amazon.com/ch/52-1279034

Amazon Smile

About Amazon Smile: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/ref=smi_se_rspo_laas_aas

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Support The Vegetarian Resource Group by purchasing a book from the VRG online book catalog. The Vegetarian Resource Group Book Catalog offers a wide range of vegan books including:

51L8rcPscgL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

Simply Vegan
Grills Gone Vegan
Vegan Meals for One or Two
Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World
Gluten-Free Tips and Tricks for Vegans
Vegan Soul Kitchen
Vegan Brunch
Artisan Vegan Cheese
The Joy of Vegan Baking
Vegans Know How to Party
The Lowfat Jewish Vegetarian Cookbook
Teff Love
Vegan Seafood: Beyond the Fish Shtick for Vegetarians
Vegan Microwave Cookbook
More Fabulous Beans
Soups On!
Nona’s Italian Kitchen
Food Allergy Survival Guide
The Natural Vegan Kitchen
Asian Fusion
The Indian Vegan Kitchen
The 4-Ingredient Vegan
The Almond Milk Cookbook
And so many more….

FREE media mail shipping for orders over $30 in the United States only! Inquire about shipping costs outside the USA before placing your order.

Visit http://www.vrg.org/catalog/ to order books online and support VRG’s outreach at the same time!

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Vegetarian Resource Group will host a vegan dinner at LYFE Kitchen in Chicago (at Fairbanks and Ontario) on Sunday, October 22, 2017 during the annual meeting of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Meet VRG advisors Reed Mangels PhD, RD, Catherine Conway MS RD, Charles Stahler, Debra Wasserman, and vegetarian dietitians from around the country. The public is welcome. Please register ASAP to make sure you can grab a seat!

MENU
Edamame Hummus
Kale and Cranberry Salad
Ancient Grain Stir-Fry Bowl with stir-fried vegetables, beefless tips, quinoa, black rice, cilantro, and sweet chili-ginger sauce
Vegan Thai Red Curry Bowl with garlic-lime tofu, broccoli, eggplant, peppers, peas,
whole grain wheatberries, Thai basil, and coconut curry sauce
Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookie
Tea or Coffee
The meal will be served family style. Note: Seating is limited!

TO RESERVE
Send $35 per person (includes tax and tip) with names to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203; Call (410) 366-8343 9am-5pm Mon.-Fri. EST to charge over the phone. Or pay at www.vrg.org/donate and write Chicago Dinner in the Comments.

# Attending X $35/person = $_____
Donation towards professional outreach: $_____
Total enclosed: $_____

Names of attendees:
Address:
Email:
Phone:

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


By Brigette Dumais

quinoa-bar-pineapple-coconut-01

Paul’s Finest Quinoa Coconut and Pineapple Bar is a filling treat, perfect for camping, cycling, hiking, or just a good ol’ snack. The base is quinoa puffs and it is flavored with pineapple, coconut, pumpkin seeds, almonds, and hazelnuts. There is a hint of coconut sugar and sweetness from the pineapple, however the most prominent tastes are the nuts and seeds. To find out more about Paul’s Finest Quinoa, check out their website here:
https://www.paulsquinoa.com/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Detroit Filling Station

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Blueberry Café
547 Central Ave.
Newark, NJ 07107
Enjoy Raw Salad Bowls, juices, smoothies, soups, and desserts! Blueberry Café has a Sunday Brunch Special which includes an 8oz juice, a breakfast item, a taco or burger wrap, and a 4oz soup or salad.

Bot Bakery
7100 S. South Shore Dr.
Chicago, IL 60649
All menu items at Bot Bakery are vegan, organic, and gluten free. Many reviews state that Bot Bakery has “the best baked goods ever.” Try the almond cake, whoopie pies, or deep dish “cheese” pizza for an extra special treat. Cash only!

Detroit Street Filling Station
300 Detroit St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Located in what was once a filling station opened in 1925, Detroit Street Filling Station makes everything from scratch, using local and organic produce. The range of international dishes offered, from North African cauliflower couscous to loaded nachos with Cuban black beans, demonstrates the variety and versatility of plant-based whole foods.

FuBar Toronto
735 Bloor St. West
Toronto, ON M6G 1L5 Canada
FuBar is located upstairs from Apiecalypse Now Pizza and next to Christie Pits Park. You can order vegan pizza and vegan jalapeño poppers to pair with your vegan beer. They even have vegan donuts!

Hippocrates’ Daughter
1 Mountain St.
Grimsby, ON L3M 3J5 Canada
Hippocrates’ Daughter is inspired by the famous quote by Hippocrates “Let thy food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food.” The offer sandwiches, juices, bowls, salads, desserts, and entrees. The Fried Chick’n Po’boy is enjoyed by vegans and omnivores alike.

Leaves Café
2051 Rue de La Montagne
Montreal, QC H3G 1Z8 Canada
Leaves Café has some of the best lattes in town! You can choose between almond, soy, or coconut milk. They also have baked goods including almond brioche and donuts. Leaves Café has a minimalist aesthetic and the cafe is decorated with cool cacti and succulents.

Nick’s Kitchen
2449 Geneva Ave.
Daly City, CA 94014
Nick’s Kitchen menu features iconic American items such as meatloaf with mashed potatoes, chicken BBQ, crab cakes, and succulent ribs–all made meat-free. Nick’s also pays homage to the restaurant’s Filipino roots and serves up numerous Filipino dishes including Longsilog (sweet vegan pork sausage with tofu scramble and garlic rice) and Puto Maya at Tsokolate (sweet rice with native Filipino cacao) among others.

Ocean Organics
21 South Hope Chapel Rd.
Jackson, NJ 08527
and
570 Fischer Blvd.
Toms River, NJ 08753
and
1411 NW Central Ave.
Seaside Park, NJ 08753
Ocean Organics serves a variety of juices, smoothies, sandwiches, and acai bowls. Signature sandwiches include the BBQ Pulled Jackfruit Sandwich and the Buffalo Cauliflower Wrap. The banana hemp protein shake and Vegan soft serve ice creams are a sweet treat!

On The Bus
Milwaukee Public Market
400 N. Water St.
Milwaukee, WI 53202
On the Bus is a 1971 Volkswagen Bus that serves veggie food located at Milwaukee Public Market. The menu includes breakfast food such as acai bowls, veggie burgers and sandwiches, desserts, smoothies, and shakes!

Planta Burger
4 Temperance St.
Toronto, ON M5H 1Y4 Canada
Stop by Planta Burger for delicious vegan burgers and sides! Try the “Crab” cakes paired with cauliflower tots for a special treat. Don’t forget to order dessert including milkshakes and a root beer float.

P.S. Kitchen
246 W. 48th St.
New York, NY 10036
P.S. Kitchen is conveniently located in New York City’s Theatre District in Midtown West. They donate 100% of their profit to various sustainable charities. Their “Buffalo Hen of the Woods” dish is among the most highly rated entrees. The “Maitake Mushroom Bun” is also very popular. P.S. Kitchen has a wide selection of desserts, including Strawberry Shortcake and “Chocolate & Raspberry.”

Roots Café
408G Paulding Ave.
Northvale, NJ 07647
The cafe is located on the rear side of a large commercial complex, so keep an eye out for signs pointing you their way. Roots Café has a “Build Your Bowl” option so you can customize your delicious meal. They also keep their menu fresh with Daily Specials. Many patrons recommend the “Beyond Good” Burrito. Roots Cafe has a unique, cozy ambience and is filled with plants.

Sweet Green Café
25 N. Spruce St.
Ramsey, NJ 07446
In addition to delicious vegan food, gluten free, raw, and oil free options are available at Sweet Green Café. They have a “sweet” menu and a “savory” menu. The Tofu Scramble Veggie Sandwich is a signature dish.

Vegan Tree
952 Rte. 34, Ste. 4
Matawan, NJ 07747
Vegan Tree serves appetizers, soups and salads, sandwiches, rice entrees, noodles, and smoothies. Favorites include the King Pao Fusion Rice Dish and the Vegan Tree Stir-Fried Noodles. The Vegan Tree Green Smoothie is a great treat!

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Better Bean is offering a free tub of beans (while offer lasts).

Roasted-Chipotle-Bean-Dip-1

The company produces Southwestern Pinto Beans, Uncanny Refried Black Beans, Tuscan White Beans, Cuban Black Beans, Roasted Chipotle Red Beans, Skillet Refried Red Beans, Three Sisters Chili, and more.

Go to:
https://betterbeanco.com/delicious-beans-back-school/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

big bowl

With seven locations in Illinois, Minnesota, and Virginia, Big Bowl offers several vegan items on its menu as well as a stir-fry bar. The menu displays a “V” icon next to entrées that are vegetarian.
See: http://bigbowl.com/

The VRG contacted Laura Nessel, the Director of Marketing & Sales at Big Bowl, in July-September 2017 for more information on their vegan menu options:
http://bigbowl.com/menu/

Here is what we discovered:

Q: How do you define “vegetarian” for your menu icon?
A: Items that do not have any meat product.

Q: When you say that the vegetarian items contain “no meat”: Are fish, seafood and poultry, along with any ingredient derived from them such as animal flavors or gelatin, included in “no meat”?
A: Yes, the “no meat” refers to items that do not contain fish, seafood, poultry, chicken, etc. which includes chicken stock and/or fish sauce…

Q: Do you consider egg and milk as vegetarian?
A: We DO NOT consider egg and milk as vegetarian but egg and milk can be taken out of most dishes besides the desserts.

Q: Is there any dairy in any of your menu options?
A: Yes, only in the desserts

Q: Is honey in any of your dishes?
A: Yes, it is used in our BBQ hoisin sauce which is served with our Chicken Lettuce Wraps, Vietnamese Chicken Soup and BBQ Pork Fried Rice entrée.

Q: Which items (especially sauces) have added sugar? Do you know if it’s cane and/or beet sugar?
A: All sauces have added sugar. If someone cannot have sugar we can make the dish with soy sauce. The only other options for a guest who cannot have sugar are steamed vegetables (plain or with soy sauce) and white or brown rice.

We use cane sugar.

Q: What are the ingredients for the homemade peanut sauce for the Sesame Peanut Noodles?
A: Peanuts, peanut oil (ground peanuts, canola oil), garlic, ginger, Thai chilies, Fresno peppers, salt, sugar, black tea, dried chilies, soy sauce, mushroom soy, rice wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, Sichuan peppercorns, sesame oil, Sichuan oil

Q: What are the ingredients in the sesame vinaigrette?
A: San J® tamari, Dijon mustard, rice vinegar, red wine vinegar, sugar, mustard powder, kosher salt, canola oil, sesame oil

Q: Which sauces (on the stir-fry menu) can be made vegetarian? Which contain added sugar?
A: Mushroom Shanghai Ginger Garlic, Thai Green Curry, Orange Sauce, Sichuan Sauce and Kung Pao can all be made vegetarian. All sauces have added sugar that cannot be removed.

Q: What are the ingredients in the vegetarian sauces listed on the stir-fry menu?
A: Mushroom Shanghai Ginger Garlic- vegetable shanghai sauce (soy sauce, mushroom soy, vegetarian oyster sauce, sugar), garlic, ginger, vegetable broth, cornstarch

Thai Green Curry- San J tamari, lemongrass, ginger, garlic, yellow onions, Serrano chilies, green pepper, habanero, fennel seeds, coriander, cumin, black pepper, cloves, nutmeg, turmeric, kosher salt, sugar, lemon zest, cilantro stems, canola oil, coconut milk, water

Orange Sauce-soy sauce, lemon juice, sugar, water

Sichuan Sauce- soy sauce, sugar, lan chi chili paste, hoisen sauce, red wine vinegar, vegetable broth

Kung Pao- red wine vinegar, mushroom soy, soy sauce, hoisen sauce, lan chi chili sauce, bean sauce, sugar, vegetable broth

Q: Has the red wine vinegar in the Peanut Sauce and Kung Pao Sauce been clarified (i.e., made clear) with an animal product such as gelatin or albumen? [VRG Note: This may occur in wine processing.]
A: No, it is not clarified with any animal products.

Q: Are there any differences between the Orange, Kung Pao and Sichuan vegetarian sauces and the sauces with the same names listed just above the vegetarian sauces list on the stir fry bar menu? (In other words, do you have two separate versions of these sauces?)
A: Yes. The base for these sauces all start out as the same (which are vegetarian) but to make them into a thinner sauce consistency we add chicken stock. For the “vegetarian” section of the stir fry we use vegetable stock instead.

Q: Are there any animal flavors or broths used to prepare the rice, vegetables or the tofu in the Thai Green Vegetable Curry with Tofu?
A: This is vegetarian as well as vegan just how it is…No animal flavors or broths used.

Q: What is in the Yellow Curry Vegetable with Tofu that makes it non-vegetarian? Can this dish be made vegetarian?
A: There is fish sauce in the curry paste used to make the sauce. It cannot be made vegetarian.

Q: Can the Thai Hot Pepper or the Pad See Ew be made vegetarian? Can tofu be substituted?
A: Unfortunately, no to both. The thai hot pepper sauce contains fish sauce and the pad see ew contains oyster sauce.

Q: Are the vegetables and tofu prepared away from all meats with sanitized utensils on clean surfaces?
A: Yes, although we don’t have a dedicated kitchen for preparing vegetarian items. Whenever a new prep task begins, all equipment is washed and sanitized.

Q: Is there any coating on the tofu? Is it plain to begin with or pre-seasoned? Are your answers true for all tofu including that in your dishes as well as at the stir fry bar?
A: There is no coating on the tofu; it is plain to begin with. Tofu for all dishes is plain with the exception of the vegetable fried rice (tofu is coated in cornstarch and sesame seeds and fried). But for the fried rice we can make the tofu plain.

Q: How is the tofu prepared for the stir fry bar? Is this preparation the same for the tofu in some of your other dishes?
A: For the stir fry bar it is plain (no seasoning). See above answer for other menu items.

Q: Is the tofu sautéed in fresh oil unshared with non-vegetarian menu items? Do you serve it uncooked?
A: Yes, it is sautéed in fresh oil. We DO NOT serve it uncooked.

Q: What is it about the Spicy Sichuan Green Beans that makes them non-vegetarian?
A: The green beans are fried in a fryer that is used for other meat products. They cannot be prepared vegetarian.

Q: Does the vegetable fried rice contain animal ingredients or egg? Can it be made without it?
A: It does contain eggs, which CAN be removed. Our fried rice also does contain oyster sauce but we can prepare it for vegetarians using a vegetarian oyster sauce upon request.

Q: Does the Pad Thai contain egg? Can it be made without it?
A: Yes, it does contain eggs, they CAN be removed. Please note that the Pad Thai sauce contains fish sauce which CANNOT be removed, therefore this dish cannot be made vegetarian.

Q: Do you use oyster sauce (or something similar) in any of your dishes?
A: Most of our Chinese dishes have oyster sauce as well as chicken broth but we can make most of the sauces vegetarian upon request using a vegetarian oyster sauce and vegetable broth.

Q: What are the ingredients in the Vegetable Potstickers and the Vegetable Dumplings?
A: They contain bok choy, scallions, mushrooms, cilantro, basil, carrots, cabbage, ginger, soy bean, corn starch, bamboo shoots, sesame and canola oil, soy sauce and sugar.

Q: Do the Potstickers and Dumplings have an outer breading of some type? If so, what is its ingredients?
A:The ingredients in the flour wrapper for the Dumplings and Potstickers consist of wheat flour, water, wheat gluten, cornstarch and salt.

Q: How are the Potstickers cooked? If they are fried, is the frying oil shared with meat or fish?
A: The Potstickers are pan-seared on a griddle in oil that is solely used for the Potstickers.

Q: How are the Dumplings prepared?
A: The Dumplings are steamed.

Q: Has the rice wine vinaigrette in the Vegetable Summer Rolls been clarified with an animal ingredient such as gelatin or albumen?
A: No. The sauce is vegetarian and vegan. It contains rice wine vinegar, sugar, salt, sesame and canola oil and thai chilies.

Q: What are the ingredients in the outer wrap of the Summer Rolls?
A: Tapioca starch, rice starch, salt, water

Q: Do you have any plans to expand into other states and/or open restaurants in other parts of the three states you’re currently in?
A: Not at this time.

Here’s a listing of meatless menu options without dairy or egg at Big Bowl based on information that we’ve received from this restaurant chain:

Appetizers
Vegetable Potstickers*
Vegetable Dumplings*
Steamed Edamame
Vegetable Summer Roll
Sesame Peanut Noodles
Salads
House Mixed Greens Salad
Fried Rice
Vegetable Fried Rice** with Crispy Garlic Tofu
Curries
Thai Green Vegetable Curry with Tofu
Stir Fry Bar
Vegetables
Tofu
Sauces:
Mushroom Shanghai Ginger Garlic
Thai Green Curry
Orange Sauce
Sichuan Sauce
Kung Pao

* = Unknown sugar processing (filling)
** = Upon special request only

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

For information on vegetarian and vegan restaurants, see:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

For information on other chains, see:
http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group research, join at:
http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

Or donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


The recent issue of Vegetarian Journal includes an article by Debra Daniels-Zeller titled “Healthy Vegan Dishes on a Budget!” Debra provides tips on how to save money when preparing vegan meals and also shares recipes for:
Spicy Black Beans
Grilled Pepper and Quinoa-Millet Salad with Raspberry Vinaigrette
Zucchini-Corn Chowder with Tomatoes
Kidney Bean-Sweet Potato Stew
Lemon Cornbread
Lemon-Carrot Coleslaw
Tofu-Broccoli Noodle Bowl

Pepper Quinoa-Millet Salad

You can read the entire article here:
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2017issue3/2017_issue3_dishes_budget.php

Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal by visiting:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


veganteen.net interviewed the 2017 $10,000 Vegetarian Resource Group scholarship winner.

Aaditi

To read the article, see:
http://www.veganteen.net/vegan-teen-activism-sholarships-an-interview-with-aaditi-tamhankar/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Each issue of Vegetarian Journal includes a column called Vegetarian Action. In the latest issue we feature Scott Jurek. Writer Savannah Lawrence states:

Jurek

“Scott Jurek is a well-known figure in the running community, and not just because of the races he’s won or the records he’s set. As an ultrarunner — a runner who competes in races beyond the distance of a marathon — Jurek follows a vegan diet, which surprises many runners and athletes who believe that endurance training requires animal protein for muscular fuel. Jurek’s achievements are vast and include setting the U.S. record for a 24-hour road run, seven consecutive wins at the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run, three consecutive wins at the Spartathlon 152-mile race, and two consecutive wins at the 135-mile Badwater run, to name a few. He credits much of his success to his healthy vegan diet, training, and racing with confidence.”

Read the complete article here:
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2017issue3/2017_issue3_vegetarian_action.php

Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal by visiting:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


By Casey Brown, VRG Volunteer

Asheville VegFest 2017

Vegan Awareness Week took place from August 28 to September 3, 2017 in Asheville, NC. Throughout the week, the Asheville Vegan Society hosted many events with speakers, food, and screenings at The Block off Biltmore. The week culminated with the main event: Asheville Vegfest. Vegfest took place on Pack Square Park in downtown Asheville and featured many vendors, organizations, speakers, and musicians.

While staffing The Vegetarian Resource Group booth, the other volunteer and I were able to interact with many individuals living in or visiting Asheville, and we were also able to connect with many other like-minded organizations in the area. We met a lot of people who were already vegan or interested in going vegan and came specifically for the event, but we also met quite a few people who were exploring downtown and just happened upon the event. This was a great way to educate individuals who may not have known a lot about a vegan lifestyle previously. Many people expressed interest in learning more about veganism since they wanted to choose healthier alternatives for their meals.

The most common concern people had was that they were having trouble finding vegan recipes. We were able to show them our cookbook options, give them a copy of the Vegetarian Journal which contains vegan recipes, give them a recipe card for a veggie burger, and suggest some of our favorite recipes! Many individuals were interested in learning more about vegan pregnancy, so we were able to give them a copy of our “Vegan Nutrition in Pregnancy and Childhood” brochures and suggest The Everything Vegan Pregnancy Book by Reed Mangels, which can be found in the book catalog on our website.

Our “My Vegan Plate” handouts and “Veganism in a Nutshell” brochures were very popular among the crowd, especially those who were interested in learning more about transitioning to a vegan diet. One lady we met expressed that her relatives do not understand veganism. She said that her immediate family is vegan, but family get-togethers were hard for them. She took a copy of our Vegetarian Journal to get recipe ideas and more information to share with her relatives. Another lady we met told us that her new neighbors expressed an interest in veganism. She was interested in gathering a variety of materials to make their transition easier.

We met multiple people who were interested in using The VRG’s handouts within their careers. A middle school teacher wanted to use some of our resources for her nutrition class and another organization wanted to use our “I Love Animals and Broccoli Coloring Books” for children that come to her events. We also met a lady who wanted to use some of our materials to start a vegan meetup group in her area. One person visited our booth stating that it “seemed like the perfect first stop to learn more about veganism.” She was hoping to better understand the basics of veganism and took home a handful of our resources, so she could learn more.

This was the first Vegan Awareness Week that I have ever experienced, and it was amazing! I loved being able to attend many of the events throughout the week, interact with people in the community, and educate others on veganism. Thank you to everyone who visited our booth at Asheville Vegfest! The VRG will be at the University of Buffalo’s Sustainability Event in New York next.

To volunteer at booths, contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org
To support The Vegetarian Resource Group outreach, donate at www.vrg.org/donate
Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Do you know exactly what nutritional yeast is? An article in the recent issue of Vegetarian Journal answers this question and also provides the following vegan recipes containing nutritional yeast:
Lemon Rice Soup
Tempeh Mushroom Casserole
Mushroom Gravy
Tofu Pimento Spread
Spicy Nacho “Cheese” Dip
Tofu Dip
Baked Lima Beans

yeast

Read the article here:
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2017issue3/2017_issue3_nutritional_yeast.php

Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal by visiting:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Curry Sauce

In each issue of Vegetarian Journal we review vegan products. Below find reviews for Jaipur in a Jar (Maya Kaimal’s simmer sauces), Jawea Ice Cream, Tasty Tofu by Hodo Soy, and Munk Pack (squeeze packs great for hiking, etc.).

See: http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2017issue3/2017_issue3_veggie_bits.php

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

inchins-bamboo-garden

Inchin’s restaurant chain indicates on its menus which items are vegan. For example, items they indicate as vegan are: sweet corn soup, hot and sour soup, lotus root chips, Thai curry puffs, and cauliflower Manchurian. To see a menu by location, go to:
http://www.bamboo-gardens.com/menu#

For information on other chains, see http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

For info on vegan and vegetarian restaurants, see http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

The contents of this posting, our website, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Amazon Smile

Please book mark and use this link. Eligible shopping will support Vegetarian Resource Group vegan education and activism. http://smile.amazon.com/ch/52-1279034

About Amazon Smile: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/ref=smi_se_rspo_laas_aas

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Vegetarian Resource Group will host a vegan dinner at LYFE Kitchen in Chicago (at Fairbanks and Ontario) on Sunday, October 22, 2017 during the annual meeting of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Meet VRG advisors Reed Mangels PhD, RD, Catherine Conway MS RD, Charles Stahler, Debra Wasserman, and vegetarian dietitians from around the country. The public is welcome.

MENU
Edamame Hummus
Kale and Cranberry Salad
Ancient Grain Stir-Fry Bowl with stir-fried vegetables, beefless tips, quinoa, black rice,
cilantro, and sweet chili-ginger sauce
Vegan Thai Red Curry Bowl with garlic-lime tofu, broccoli, eggplant, peppers, peas,
whole grain wheatberries, Thai basil, and coconut curry sauce
Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookie
Tea or Coffee

The meal will be served family style. Note: Seating is limited!

TO RESERVE
Send $35 per person (includes tax and tip) with names to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203; Call (410) 366-8343 9am-5pm Mon.-Fri. EST to charge over the phone. Or pay at www.vrg.org/donate and write Chicago Dinner in the Comments.

# Attending X $35/person = $_____
Donation towards professional outreach: $_____
Total enclosed: $_____

Names of attendees:
Address:
Email:
Phone:

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

donuts

Purple Glaze located at 516 Summerfield Ave., Asbury Park, NJ 07712 is a donut shop that offers vegan vanilla and chocolate cake donuts with numerous vegan toppings. We ordered a dozen and asked them to surprise us with a wide selection of toppings. The donuts are beautiful and delicious. The shop is open Wed. through Monday 7:30 am to 2 pm. They are closed Tuesdays. For more information call 732-361-5308 or visit purpleglazedonuts.com

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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By Shannon Borgoyn, VRG intern

Fast food is a staple of American culture: you can’t go anywhere without seeing a McDonald’s, Wendy’s, or KFC. When I first heard of HipCityVeg, I thought it was a dream. HipCityVeg is a currently small (but growing) vegan fast food chain founded in 2012. Yes, you heard that right: vegan fast food.

Recently, I traveled to Washington D.C. and planned on getting lunch at HipCityVeg. The establishment is located in D.C.’s Chinatown, not too far from the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Walking into the restaurant, I was greeted by a well-lit, well-decorated, and clean interior. As I approached the counter, the staff greeted me and asked if they could help me. I expressed my excitement to be there for the first time, but I told them I needed time to decide on my order. It was difficult to choose a dish because everything looked delicious! Initially, I thought there would only be vegan burgers and fries, but I was surprised by the menu’s diversity.

They have different types of vegan burgers and sandwiches (like their curry tofu wrap and Philly steak); vegan chicken (“chick’n”) dishes (such as their chipotle fajita wrap and lil’ golden nugs); salads including udon noodle and arugula taco; sides including sweet potato fries and Caesar salad; drinks such as smoothies and lemonade; and frozen treats (soy ice cream milkshakes anyone?). Scanning through this sea of food was daunting, but I finally decided on the traditional fast food fare: nuggets, fries, and a milkshake. Their milkshakes come in three different flavors (chocolate, orangesicle, and vanilla) as well as seasonal flavors: Cold Brew Mocha Shake for July-August, Pumpkin Pie Shake for October-November, Chocolate-Covered Cherry Shake for February, and more. Their seasonal flavors can be referenced here:
http://hipcityveg.com/seasonal-milkshake-calendar/

I placed my order for their lil’ golden nugs, which came with a side of sweet potato fries and choice of dip, and a chocolate milkshake. First, I sampled the nuggets; they were hot and crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, and extremely delicious. Their crispy outer layer consisted of whole grains, including what appeared to be oatmeal. Second, I sampled the sweet potato fries; they were hot, tender, thin, and delicious. Third, I dipped both nuggets and fries into the dip (a black bean dip). The dip itself was creamy and cool and didn’t overpower the taste of the nuggets or fries; instead, it enhanced their taste. Between bites of nuggets and fries, I sipped at my soy chocolate milkshake. The milkshake was thick, creamy, and perfectly sweet. Having the milkshake as a beverage was the perfect accompaniment to my meal because it balanced the savory portion that was the nuggets and fries.

Overall, my meal at HipCityVeg was delicious and extremely filling. The portions were generous; as a result, I took some food home. HipCityVeg’s food appears made with the utmost care; it was hot and scrumptious (for the milkshake, wonderfully cold and creamy). The taste was extraordinary and the experience was awesome. HipCityVeg has a green philosophy, which they back up with composting bins, eco-packaging, and organic, plant-based ingredients. So, they make their food with care and in a caring, environmentally-friendly manner. I will definitely be returning to HipCityVeg!

You can check out HipCityVeg here: HipCityVeg

Additionally, you can reference HipCityVeg in VRG’s online restaurant guide. Listings are available for Philadelphia, PA and Washington D.C. locations:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

IMG_0021

Thank you to Karen Peissinger, Dorian Dalls, and Matthew Venhaus, who helped table for The Vegetarian Resource Group at the Western New York VegFest. And thank you to Karen for organizing the booth.

Karen reported: There was a constant flow of people at the VRG table from opening to about 4 PM (so much so that my voice became hoarse from talking to everyone!). Several people expressed special interest in vegan pregnancy, either for themselves, for a friend, or for a family member. See:
http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/veganpregnancy.php
https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRGparentsandkids/

One person stated that they have found the VRG to be a valuable source of information. This individual said VRG is “reputable not excitable.” This person feels confident and comfortable sending people to the www.vrg.org site because the person knows that those people will be able to find the information they need. Many who stopped at the VRG table were pleased to hear that VRG has the involvement of registered dietitians and nutritionists to ensure science-based nutrition information is provided in its publications and on its webpage www.vrg.org

Thank you to all our volunteers and dietitians, who help with education and outreach.

To support VRG’s outreach, you can donate here:
Donate to VRG

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Labor Day

Whether you’ll be with family and/or friends or simply alone Labor Day weekend, we thought you might be looking for some new vegan dish ideas. Here’s some creative ideas from previous issues of Vegetarian Journal:

Modern Vegan Comfort Food
Debra Daniels-Zeller provides recipes for:
Black Bean Chili with Cornbread Dumplings
Roasted Vegetable Pizza
Grits and Greens
Country Biscuits topped with Warm Mushroom Gravy
Lentil Loaf with Garlic Mashed Cauliflower Potatoes
Shepherd’s Pie
Baked Beans

Gourmet Grilling
Chef Nancy Berkoff serves up:
Grilled Eggplant
Mediterranean Grilled Portobellos with Pine Nuts
Curried Barbecue Tempeh
Roasted Pepper and Eggplant Dip
Pineapple-Peach Salsa
Grilled Asparagus – Japanese Style
Grilled Sweet Peaches
Roasted Corn

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

DC VegFest

If you’re attending any of the events below, be sure to stop by The Vegetarian Resource Group’s booth at the following events and say hello:

DC VegFest
Lot H/I at Yards Park
355 Water Street SE
Washington DC 20003
September 2nd from 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Asheville VegFest
Pack Square Park
121 College Street
Asheville NC 28801
Sunday, September 3rd from 10 AM — 6 PM

Charlottesville Vegan Roots Festival
Booker T. Washington Park
1001 Preston Avenue
Charlottesville, VA 22903
Saturday, September 30th
from 12:00 PM — 8:00 PM

World Veg Festival
San Francisco County Fair Building
in Golden Gate Park
1199 9th Avenue
San Francisco CA, 94122
Sunday, October 1st, 10 AM-6:30 PM

New Jersey VegFest
Meadowlands Expo Center
355 Plaza Dr
Secaucus, NJ 07094
Saturday, October 7th
and Sunday, October 8th
(The festival schedule is TBA
so be sure to check the website for
updates)

Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
McCormick West Building
2301 S King Dr
Chicago, IL 60616
October 21-24, 2017

The Vegetarian Resource Group’s Dinner
LYFE Kitchen
270 E Ontario St
Chicago, IL 60610
(Corner of N Fairbanks Ct. and Ontario)
Sunday, October 22nd at 6 PM
$35/person

To support our outreach efforts, please donate:
vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Civico 1845

By Rebekah Campbell, VRG intern

Civico 1845 is located in San Diego, California, and is located in a part of town called Little Italy that brings many Italian cultures and food into San Diego. I had the privilege of going to Civico 1845. Civico offers many different authentic Italian food menus, one of which is vegan. They make sure to only use fresh, locally grown ingredients in all their dishes. I ordered the Melanzana Alla Parmigiana, which is made with eggplant and smoked vegan mozzarella. Drinks such as wine and beer are offered.

Surprisingly, Civico offers a vegan dessert menu as well, which I ordered the Gelato Tartufo from. The Gelato Tartufo was extremely rich with Italian Dark Chocolate and was stuffed with gooey caramel chocolate.

Reservations should be made for Civico 1845, for it is hard to get a walk-in seat. Overall, the experience was restful, and great.

Check out the menu or make reservations at www.civico1845.com

Click on vegan at http://www.civico1845.com/menu/

For information on other veggie restaurants in the USA and Canada, see:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Papa John's

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

An email forwarded to The VRG in August 2017 from online reader Ben had been delivered to his inbox from a “Nutrition Analyst” at Papa John’s in response to his Papa John’s online inquiry.

This is how Ben introduced the following Papa John’s information to us:

“I am a lacto-ovo vegetarian who has frequently visited your site, reading about information such as disambiguated food ingredients and specific food content from name-brand restaurants. I wish to donate information in the hopes of helping to update such regarding the Papa John’s pizza chain.”

Here in its entirety is the forwarded email from Papa John’s addressed to Ben in response to his “…inquiring whether or not their Garlic Parmesan Breadsticks were vegetarian (lacto-ovo).” Papa John’s responded to Ben within 12 hours of his inquiry.

Papa John’s email:

“The majority of our products contain bio-synthesized and/or vegetable-derived enzymes, including our mozzarella cheese.

However, the cheese blend used on our Tuscan Six Cheese Pizza does contain animal-derived enzymes.

Our pizza dough contains fungal or bacterial derivatives.

Our garlic sauce contains lactic acid, which is not classified as an animal derivative because it has been fermented.

Blue cheese and ranch DO contain animal-derived rennet.

The rennet that is used in the Papa John’s Parmesan cheese is a GMO-free microbial rennet. It is not animal-derived. It would be suitable for vegetarian consumption.”

The VRG appreciates Ben taking the time to forward this email.

It appears from the website that the breadsticks are made with pizza dough that does not contain L-cysteine (most often derived from poultry feathers). L-cysteine is not listed on the website menu nor on the allergen page.
http://www.papajohns.com/company/papa-johns-ingredients.html#pizza

http://www.papajohns.com/allergens/papa-johns-allergen-guide.html

Unlike many restaurant chains, Papa John’s includes “vegetable” as the source for their mono- and diglycerides in the ingredients list for the Garlic Parmesan Sauce. However, this chain does not specify if the “natural flavors” in this sauce are vegetable-derived. (They may or may not be.)

There is sugar in menu components which appear otherwise vegan (the original and pan doughs and the pizza and pan sauces but not the Garlic Parmesan Sauce).

Concerned readers may wish to contact Papa John’s for more information on whether the natural flavors are vegetable-derived and if the sugar had been processed using cow bone char.

See our previous reports on cheese enzymes and sugar for more information:
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2008issue3/2008_issue3_update_renet.php

http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2007issue4/2007_issue4_sugar.php

Here are a couple of our past reports on Papa John’s:

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/03/12/update-on-papa-johns-vegetarian-and-vegan-menu-options/

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/04/07/papa-johns-dough-enzyme-stearic-acid-and-cookie-ingredients-are-vegetarian/

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

For additional information about quick service chains, see:
http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

For information about vegetarian and vegan restaurants and where you might be able to order vegan pizza, see:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


By Davin Cheyenne

Davin photo

I had no idea what to expect this summer when I applied to be a summer intern for The Vegetarian Resource Group. I knew very little about the intricate details involved in supporting the vegan movement on such a wide scale. However, I have met so many fascinating and hardworking people, people who work day in and day out fighting for things most people have no idea are happening. Two of these people are my bosses. The impact these two have and continue to make for the vegan movement is beyond incredible, and their guidance has allowed me to exceed further with this internship. I was given many projects to complete, and one of them was to interview an influential person in the vegan community.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with Naijha Wright-Brown, the co-owner of vegan soul restaurant Land of Kush in Baltimore City. It was taking part in this that allowed me to see the beauty in being an intern for this non-profit such as allowing me the ability to network and meet so many amazing people who are just as passionate concerning veganism as I am. While interviewing Naijha I was able to tour the restaurant, try the incredible food, and write an article about my experience that many will read in a future issue of Vegetarian Journal.

Writing this piece was part of another component of my internship, along with writing restaurant reviews for The Vegetarian Resource Group website. It was through writing articles that I could see my writing skills improving. I just want you to know that for anyone who wants to have work in any field with some degree of writing, grammar is super important. However, it was with writing these articles that I was happiest. I was able to write about topics that touched my heart, and knew it would be touching others as well. I was able to increase the amount of depth with each new piece I wrote and for once I felt as though I was a part of something big.

I had a lot of experiences with visiting other locations and volunteering, which was my favorite part of this internship. Networking allowed me to connect with Marvin, who at the age of 90 and vegetarian most of his life, still kept his 23-acres of land and all the wild animals that live there protected from poachers. It was here that I saw him feed deer dried corn, learn the importance milkweed has on the environment, and find out about the passage of butterflies from his farm to Mexico. He explained how the vegan movement is bigger than any one person and that by simply putting the needs of others above your own you gain so much back. This way of life he talks about I have found to be true.

I was able to volunteer at The Vegetarian Resource Booth at Waverly Farmer’s Market in Baltimore, where I met a lot of amazing residents from the community who expressed some of their experiences with veganism. These conversations allowed me to connect personally with people from all walks of life and make lifelong connections. I even friended some visitors on Facebook. Finally, I visited TuTTies Place, a non-profit community-based group foster care model, which works with young men amid the environment in which they currently live. Every summer TuTTies place opens a camp for all children ages 5-18 to have a safe and fun place to come to every day. It was while visiting from The Vegetarian Resource Group that I was able to teach children about veganism. However, what I found was the lesson was mutual. I had explored so much about the importance of family, education, and the impact children have to the world that I left feeling more whole than I came.

As my experience as an intern comes to a close I am writing product reviews about vegan products that I really enjoy, along with traveling to nearby vegan restaurants to write about my experience. I can honestly say that having the experience as an intern here at The Vegetarian Resource Group has filled my summer with amazing opportunities, lifelong connections, and an extensive amount of skills I will be able to use for my future. I would like to thank every single person who is a part of The Vegetarian Resource Group for this once in a lifetime experience.

For information about The Vegetarian Resource Group internships, see: http://www.vrg.org/student/index.php

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group outreach, donate at: www.vrg.org/donate

Join at: http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

a14

By Davin Cheyenne

Most teenagers already have a preconceived notion about college and all of its many splendors. College is a fantasy for most high schoolers: dreaming of food halls stocked with fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy alternatives, and desserts sometimes unavailable is now within reach.

Before college, I became vegan my junior year of high school. It was very hard to be vegan in a public high school where the lunches provided were for meat eaters, but I made it work. I was ecstatic to hear that in most colleges there were vegan options beginning to be provided.

When I was accepted to my previous college, I was excited to see a station in the cafeteria dedicated to vegan options. However, the next year when I actually attended the college the station was gone, and the plant-based options were few. Because of this I was discouraged and my health began to degrade. I wasn’t eating like I used to: plentiful fruits and veggies every day. Thankfully I was chosen to become a part of a diversity program. I had to create a campus wide project to demonstrate leadership skills. So, I chose veganism as the central topic. I wanted to create a week of vegan meals for my school’s campus to taste test. The student population would provide feedback for vegan meal options on campus they would like. Before starting, I needed a name for it; I chose “Chicks Dig Vegans.”

In order to be successful, I had to contact my college’s food service. First, I scheduled a meeting with my school’s cafeteria chef. I provided the chef with a list of my goals for the project, a list of vegan menu options, and required paperwork from the cafeteria. The vision for my project was to raise awareness throughout my campus community and help incorporate delicious vegan entrees in the cafeteria. Some menu options included chia seed muffins, fruit with granola parfaits, vegetable lo mein, chili, casseroles, vegan pot-roast, imitation “tuna” sandwiches, etc.

To pull this off, I needed some assistance so I reached out to two friends for help. Throughout the week my friends created flyers to post around campus, and sent all students notifications and emails. Their help allowed the event to run smoothly. I had three vegan options served outside our cafeteria for all students, staff, and faculty to taste and provide feedback for what they wanted in the cafeteria. Some crowd pleasing menu options were a Mediterranean salad, sweet potato casserole, and chili. Some unwelcome choices were an “egg” salad and chia seed pudding.

My project was awarded the most attended. Due to the amount of participation and positive feedback my project received, the cafeteria within my college incorporated a vegan station, vegan meats, cheeses, spreads, and ice creams. We built a bigger community at my college: 200 out of the 1000 people who tested the meals gave us their emails to learn more about veganism and animal rights.

Some of the options served (that were incorporated into the cafeteria) were the chili, vegetable lo mein, and an Indian curry. As the leader of this project I was overwhelmed with the amount of positivity and success I gained at my institution by simply providing information about veganism. Of course the tasty samples helped gain more followers as well.

Now for those entering or already attending college and wondering about introducing more vegan options or vegan options at all and don’t know where to begin, keep reading:

First, contact your college’s food service chef by email or walk in to discuss your diet and some options you would like. For instance my cafeteria did not have any vegan ice-cream: something on campus many vegans wanted. By simply mentioning this to the chef and showing there was a high demand many vegans at my college were now able to eat cruelty free dessert with their peers. Another challenge was my cafeteria did not have any vegetables that were not cooked with some type of animal product. Since my health involved vegetables, I asked the chef to serve the vegetables without animal products. Remember, you need to be very specific about what you want because many college chefs are not skilled in vegan or vegetarian food preparation practices!

Second, start gaining a group of people at your school from the environmental, animal rights, and conservationist interests by participating in similar clubs on campus that also uphold your morals. Upon arriving at my university, it was very hard finding people to connect with who also shared my passion for veganism. So, I searched for clubs to get involved with. One club that I joined was Animals for Advocates, a group of students passionate about animal rights and a vegan/vegetarian lifestyle. After I joined this club, I gained more volunteers for my event. You will need many followers in order for your meal plan to be long term at your institution.

Third, stick with your mission. If you do not get what you’re looking for, be an example of it; sooner than later, more people will take notice. The passion and determination I have to cater to the needs of the vegan community, especially on my campus allowed me to make a huge impact not only at my cafeteria but throughout my campus. In the beginning I received little positive feedback for my idea. However, I kept advertising my event and asked people I connected with through campus clubs to sample the meals. These people brought along more students to try the food and make a conscious decision on what they liked. Finally, I recommend expressing your passion for a vegan lifestyle, and rouse a revolution!

I hope this helps you on your journey to a more humane and animal friendly meal plan on campus.

For more information, see http://www.vrg.org/teen/#college

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

fika guacamole

The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

DaJen Café and Creamery
4845 N Orange Blossom Tr.
Orlando, FL 32810
DaJen Café and Creamery serves a variety of Jamaican cuisine. This includes Honey Ginger and Chipotle Cauliflower Bites, Jamaican Jerk BBQ Jackfruit Sliders, Jamaican Brown-Stew “Beef,” and Chick’n & Waffles Brunch. In addition to their meals, they also offer scoops, shakes, and sundaes made with Irie Cream, a dairy-free alternative to ice cream. Irie Cream is available in many unique and delicious flavors including Red Velvet Cheesecake, Lime in Da Coconut, and Rum Raisin’ the Roof.

Eden Burger
1437 N. High St.
Columbus, OH 43201
Located in the University District, Eden Burger offers classic fast food options with a vegan twist! Enjoy milkshakes, burgers, tempeh tenders, and fries. Eden Burger strives to use organic ingredients.

Fika Vegan Cantina
804 N. Limestone
Lexington, KY 40508
FIKA /fee-kah/ [n]: To stop for a moment to enjoy life with good food, good beer and good friends. If you want to enjoy a ride of flavor, imagination and magic, give Fika Vegan Cantina a try. Their menu has one meal for savory, sweet, decadent, or spicy lovers. If you’re feeling savory, we recommend trying their Min’s Lasagna which is prepared with seasonal organic and locally sourced veggies, house-made vegan ricotta, and gluten-free lasagna noodles from their friends at Lexington Pasta. Or if you’re feeling a little sweet, their Jackfruit Carnitas made with sweet and savory slow-roasted barbecued jackfruit, tucked into a gluten-free corn tortilla and garnished with sliced avocado, lime and cabbage Pico will do just the trick. Feel free to enjoy their large variety of drinks from the bar, and house made guacamole and chips!

The Fix + Co.
1 30th St.
Toronto, ON M8W 3B5 Canada
The Fix + Co. offers juices and smoothies made with seasonal ingredients. You can add vegan protein or other add-ons to any smoothie. Each smoothie is packed with healthy ingredients. For example, The Antidote contains kale, celery, cucumber, dandelion greens, Granny Smith apple, parsley, and lemon. The Fix + Co. Outdoor seating is available!

The Food Tank
239 West Center St.
Moab, UT 84532
The Food Tank creates vegan dishes using organic and local ingredients. The Kombucha, the Eggplant and Portobello Gyro, and the Chocolate Coconut bar are all highly praised.

GLAM Vegan
3301 NE 1st Ave.
Miami, FL 33137
“GLAM” is an acronym for “green living animals matter.” GLAM Vegan is located in Midtown Miami. Their signature flat breads are a menu staple. Be sure to try the Pear flatbread. GLAM also offers bowls such as the farro risotto. Outdoor seating available.

The Homegrown Smoker
8638 N. Lombard
Portland, OR 97203
The Homegrown Smoker is the ideal casual vegan restaurant to go to. It is kid-friendly, and has great outdoor seating, in which you can smell the delicious food being prepared. What could be better than vegan barbecue? One of the local favorites is the smoked rib plate, which is served with hush puppies. This delicious dish can be paired with appetizer of fried pickle spears, and the minted sweet tea can be drank to cool down. When you finish eating at the Homegrown Smoker, you can take a stroll through the St. Johns City Park.

Jet Black Coffee Company
11150 NE Weidler St.
Portland, OR 97220
With outdoor seating and free Wi-Fi, this bakery has tons of natural light and an urban nostalgia that will keep you coming back for more than the delicious coffee and vegan baked goods.

The Frying Dutchman Co.
72 Main St. West
Huntsville, ON P1H 1W9 Canada
The Frying Dutchman Co. offers vegan versions of your favorite food truck delights! Be sure to try the barbeque black bean burger and the chili fries!

The Juice Theory
514 Kings Hwy.
Brooklyn, NY 11223
There is something for everyone at The Juice Theory! They offer acai bowls, sandwiches and toasts, smoothies and juices, pre-made “grab and go” meals, and a “build your own salad” option. Many patrons have enjoyed the Avocado Bomb toast, the Burrito Love bowl, or the Chia pudding parfait.

Love Again Local
18 South Church St.
West Chester, PA 19382
This sandwich shop has an extensive selection of all vegan, GMO free meats, cheeses, dressings, and veggies to choose from to be stacked high on your choice of rolls and breads. Not to mention they have a Cuban sandwich dedicated to the owner’s father that is filled with vegan Cuban Pork, Ham, Salami, Swiss cheese, Dill Pickles, and Spicy Deli Mustard, and then grilled to perfection and held together by a Cuban roll. And not to leave seafood lovers out, they also have a sandwich named THE GF BFF* which is a ”Tuna” Sandwich made with your choice of Baked Tofu or Chickpea “tuna” salad, Spinach, Tomato, and a Dressing of Choice. This shop additionally serves salads, cookies, snacks such as fruit popsicles, and organic drinks.

Loving Heart
781 East Hwy 50
Clermont, FL 34711
Loving Heart serves everything from summer rolls and spring rolls, to crispy tofu and pad Thai. They also offer combo plates where you can try several items at once. Also enjoy smoothies and desserts!

Misfit Doughnuts & Treats
982 Monroe Ave.
Rochester, NY 14620
Misfit Doughnuts & Treats offers uniquely flavored doughnuts including Raspberry Rose, double chocolate “Darth Vader,” and S’mores. They also serve pie, cake, cheesecake, cupcakes, and truffles. Misfit Doughnuts are a treat for vegans and non-vegans alike!

Off The Griddle
6526 SE Foster Rd.
Portland, OR 97206
Off The Griddle holds special events such as Milkshake Monday and Sunday Brunch. Menu favorites include the Smokey Bleu Burger and the Buffalo Chick’n Mac & Cheeze. Off The Griddle also has many gluten-free options. They have free Wi-Fi.

Vegesaurus
Indianapolis, IN
This food truck serves up soul food. They offer delights such as Southern fried cauliflower and biscuits & gravy. Hours and location vary so be sure to follow Vegesaurus on social media.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


The Vegetarian Resource Group will host a vegan dinner at LYFE Kitchen in Chicago (at Fairbanks and Ontario) on Sunday, October 22, 2017 during the annual meeting of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Meet VRG advisors Reed Mangels PhD, RD, Catherine Conway MS RD, Charles Stahler, Debra Wasserman, and vegetarian dietitians from around the country. The public is welcome.

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MENU
-Edamame Hummus
-Kale and Cranberry Salad
-Ancient Grain Stir-Fry Bowl with stir-fried vegetables, beefless tips, quinoa, black rice, cilantro, and sweet chili-ginger sauce
-Vegan Thai Red Curry Bowl with garlic-lime tofu, broccoli, eggplant, peppers, peas, whole grain wheatberries, Thai basil, and coconut curry sauce
-Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookie
-Tea or Coffee

The meal will be served family style. Note: Seating is limited!

TO RESERVE
Send $35 per person (includes tax and tip) with names to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203; Call (410) 366-8343 9am-5pm Mon.-Fri. EST to charge over the phone. Or pay at www.vrg.org/donate and write Chicago Dinner in the Comments.

# Attending X $35/person = $_____
Donation towards professional outreach: $_____
Total enclosed: $_____

Names of attendees:
Address:
Email:
Phone:

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


One Poll conducted a U.S. online survey July 11, 2017 to July 14, 2017 of 1,000 individuals. When asking, “I think a plant based diet means,” with only one choice allowed per person, the responses were:

veggies

A Vegetarian Diet: 20.3%
A Vegan Diet: 16.9%
A vegetarian or vegan diet that is composed of whole foods: 17.8%
A whole foods diet, but can include animal products: 13.4%
I don’t know what a plant-based diet is: 23.8%
Other options: 7.8%

In this survey, 35.5% ate one or more vegetarian meals per week. However, only a total of 8.5% said they would describe themselves as a vegetarian, vegan, or eating a plant-based diet.

Of the people eating one or more vegetarian meals per week, when making food choices, most important to them to them was:

Taste: 48.5%
Personal Health: 22.3%
Cost: 13.2%
Convenience: 6.5%
9.5% (Other choices including ethics, religious beliefs, the environment, animal welfare, and not any of these)

From our observations, the people that caused the vegan and vegetarian movement and growth of products to happen had ethical, religious, environmental, and animal welfare beliefs. However, the great success of vegetarian festivals and growth of vegan products in almost every store is because of appealing to people’s taste, cost, and convenience, as well as investors wanting to make money. At vegetarian festivals, the longest lines are often for vegan baked goods or other desserts. People flock to the free or inexpensive festivals as they are low cost. A turning point in vegan products in supermarkets was when Silk Soy Milk moved soy milk from an asceptic package on the shelf to the refrigerator case next to cow’s milk, which made it much more convenient.

Of those that eat one or more vegetarian meals per week, 29.6% said they would buy “Your Favorite veggie burger cooked on the same grill where meat is cooked, if the grill is cleaned first. 26.8% said they would buy a veggie burger from the store. 11.8% said they would buy a meat alternative grown from animal cell DNA obtained ten years ago, which does not currently involve the raising of animals.

Of those that eat one or more vegetarian meals per week, 32.7% stated they would buy “Your favorite dessert containing sugar, if the source of the sugar isn’t specified.” However, only 11.6% would buy “Your favorite dessert containing sugar whitened through a bone char filter, if bone char is not in the sugar.” This seems to indicate that consumers say they will make different decisions based on knowledge. We would recommend clear labeling of sources on packages and on company websites so consumers can make their own informed choices, and have confidence in the business.

So when the respondents think about a plant-based diet, they can have very different ideas of what it means or what is important to them. If a business wants to cater to people on a plant-based diet, based on this survey, the business would need to do more research on their customers to find out what they want. If a dietitian is counseling a patient who says he/she is on a plant-based diet, that health professional would also have to ask more questions.

Note there are always sampling errors in surveys. Since the One Poll was not weighted towards the actual makeup of the U.S. population, we wouldn’t extrapolate these results to make conclusions about numbers in the U.S. population. One Poll surveyed 1,000 U.S. adults online July 11, 2017 to July 14, 2017. One Poll is MRS and ESOMAR accredited.

For information about additional polls, see:
http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/faq.htm#poll

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Waverly Farmer's Mkt

By Davin Cheyenne

As dawn approaches, the dew from the previous night melts into the freshly picked soil each farmer touches. Fresh produce such as peaches, cherries, eggplants, and tomatoes are packed into baskets ready to make the one to two-hour journey into the city. During this time the first light is clicked on, as families awaken in their homes preparing for their early morning walk down the street to pick up fresh local groceries for the week. Bag in hand, or foot on the gas pedal, both journeys lead to the same place.

Picture a place that connects the people of the community with the farmlands surrounding them, and where people who come from a low-income background with little education on nutrition, are able to afford cherries and peaches in a friendly atmosphere. With music and dancing filling the walkways this is what Waverly Farmers Market is known for in Charm City.

Waverly Farmers market is a local farmers market conveniently located in Baltimore, and is year-round every Saturday from 7 in the morning to 12 pm. At the market expect to see a parking lot containing eccentric booths full of friendly faces and exciting samples to try, from spicy ginger pickles to homemade kombucha and freshly picked berry jams. Each booth carries a special story with its products. Something I noticed is that there are booths that have been there since the beginning of the markets opening 32 years ago, which are local favorites.

As a Vegetarian Resource Group volunteer, I only expected to hand out Vegetarian Journal magazines, sell books, and give out information on veganism. Instead, I found that the more I listened, the more I, in turn, learned and developed a relationship with each new visitor. Each individual brought along an interesting reason of why veganism is actually important for the community as a whole, from the first person that stepped up to the booth (an older gentleman who has recently converted to vegetarianism due to his fight with diabetes), to a young woman, who since childhood lived on a vegan diet, however, wanted to learn more about the impact environmental and humane reasons of veganism can have on her neighborhood.

I see the important impact volunteering at The Vegetarian Resource Group booth on Saturday had on me. Volunteering allowed me to connect more with individuals and spread the true message of veganism which is a love of all, beyond condition. I made friends with people I believe I will see all around the city, and I can only believe will help with the building of community projects I hope to be a part of in the future.

For information on how to become a part of The Vegetarian Resource Group’s volunteer group please contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Richmond VegFest booth

Earlier this summer, multiple interns and volunteers with The Vegetarian Resource Group volunteered at Richmond Vegfest in Virginia. While there, they were able to distribute resources to the crowd and connect with many individuals who stopped by the booth. As usual, our resources including “Vegetarianism in a Nutshell” handouts, “I Love Animals and Broccoli” coloring books, and copies of the Vegetarian Journal were very popular. The volunteers met with a variety of people at the event who all shared a common interest: a veggie lifestyle. Parents stopped by the booth looking for kid-friendly recipe ideas to prepare for their children. The volunteers were able to direct them to our Parents and Kids Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRGparentsandkids/) and suggest multiple different kid-friendly cookbooks that they could try. Other individuals stopped by looking for resources on transitioning to vegetarianism and suggestions of vegan meat and cheese alternatives that they could purchase. The interns and volunteers had a great time at this event and loved being able to connect with many different people in a lovely park setting.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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By Casey Brown and Marissa Thobe

The Vegetarian Resource Group recently sent five interns and volunteers to Tuttie’s Place in Gwynn Oak, Baltimore. There, we talked to youngsters ages 5-20 about what vegetarianism is, what vegetarians eat, and reasons why people go vegetarian or vegan. The students sampled vegan foods and participated in hands-on activities to learn more about vegetarianism in an interactive manner.

Tuttie’s Place is a nonprofit community organization that provides after-care and summer programs to the youth of Baltimore and residential services to foster care children. We had the privilege of working with over 20 intelligent, young children who were very curious and eager to learn about vegetarianism. The younger children (under 14) were energetic and full of spunk and they were excited to try vegan foods and meet us. The older kids (14 and up) included aspiring musicians, writers, and community leaders from schools all over Baltimore City. They were specific in their questions and thoughtful in their discussions. It was obvious to us that Tuttie’s Place empowers these students and builds their confidence.

Prior to visiting Tuttie’s Place, we formulated a lesson plan according to the age groups of the camp. Tuttie’s Place has students ranging from 5-years-old to 21-years-old, and we knew it would be better to divide them up and educate them accordingly. The classrooms were broken up into 3 sections: 5-8 year olds, 9-13 year olds, and 14-21 year olds. We decided we would start with a general introduction to the entire camp to teach them about The Vegetarian Resource Grouop and the basics of vegetarianism. We also brought different vegan foods for everyone to sample. Then we planned to divide everyone into their separate classrooms and participate in different activities with each age group.

The youngest group (5-8 year olds) would learn about My Vegan Plate, food groups, and vegetarian snacks. The middle group (9-13 year olds) would review My Vegan Plate, learn about vegan sources of calcium, discuss vegan foods and vegan cooking, and learn about Meatless Mondays. The oldest group (14-21 year olds) would guide their discussion focused around questions they had pertaining to veganism and vegetarianism. Throughout the lesson, each of the groups would also have a chance to prepare and enjoy a delicious, non-dairy dessert: banana ice cream.

We initially talked with the entire group to see what they already knew about vegetarianism. Around half of the kids were returning to the camp and remembered VRG visiting last year. The group was familiar with vegetarianism and many of the students knew someone who was vegetarian or vegan. We then asked the students what foods they thought vegetarians ate. Common answers included tofu, vegetables, almond milk, and fruits. We told them about other options including lentils, beans, nuts, and vegan specialty options, and we brought a bag full of vegan food items that they would be familiar with. We had packages of common vegan food items including pasta, chips, oats, Daiya macaroni, vegan deli meats, and plant-based milks.

Next, we sampled multiple vegan products with the students. They were all very eager to try the foods we brought, which included almond milk and soy milk, Daiya macaroni, and Tofurky deli slices. The majority of the group enjoyed all of the products and were very willing to try them. We gave each student two varieties of Tofurky slices and asked them to guess which was real meat and which was vegan meat. This allowed the kids to be more open-minded going into the taste-test, and they ended up really enjoying both flavors. They were shocked to learn that they were actually both vegan! The students also enjoyed the soy milk and almond milk, and we found that most kids preferred the soy milk option. Many students even asked for seconds since they thought it was delicious. We asked the students to raise their hands if they enjoyed the macaroni sample, and most hands shot up in the air since they loved this delicious snack!

After sampling the different foods, we split off into different classes that were based on age groups. This was vital to guiding discussions in the right direction since the younger children had different questions regarding vegetarianism than the older students would.

In the first classroom (5-8 year olds), we taught the students about My Vegan Plate, vegan snacks, and vegan cooking. We began by asking the students if they understood what vegetarians and vegans ate. We were surprised since the students answered perfectly, showing great understanding, and they even mentioned some vegan foods and meals that they regularly ate. We then asked whether the students were involved with cooking at home. The majority of the students said that they were involved in cooking and would often help prepare ingredients under their parent’s supervision. Next, we taught the kids about My Vegan Plate and we were surprised to find that many of the students were already familiar with it. We played a game with the students by asking them which category different foods fell under. Examples included chickpeas, bananas, tofu, soymilk, carrots, berries, rice, peanuts, and pasta. Most students knew which food group each ingredient belonged to, and they only needed a little assistance for the protein category. Following these activities, the students were able to color in “I Love Animals and Broccoli” coloring books, while further discussing vegetarianism.

In the second classroom (9-13 years old), we discussed the terms vegetarian and vegan. The students understood the difference between these terms, but they had a lot of questions about whether certain foods were vegetarian or vegan. They were curious whether vegetarians could eat bread, salad dressing, fish, and other items. These students were very interested in going vegetarian or trying Meatless Mondays. They informed us that they had their own Meatless Monday during camp the previous week and prepared a vegetarian taco dish for lunch. Another student said he wanted to try a vegan day, so we encouraged him to do his own vegan version of Meatless Monday. They all loved cooking and said they frequently helped with cooking at home. They were familiar with MyPlate, so we showed them My Vegan Plate and explained vegan sources of calcium to them. They were very knowledgeable about the different food groups, and we had them each draw what their plate typically looks like and categorize the foods into the appropriate food group. The students understood the importance of eating a diet with a variety of foods, with half of their plate being fruits and vegetables. We then went through a crossword and other games with the students, which challenged their knowledge about the origin of their food. We used the I Love Animals and Broccoli Shopping Basket workbook, which had questions such as “this meat comes from baby cows,” “tofu is made from _”, and “pork comes from which animal.” These questions allowed the students to make a better connection between animals and food. After the activities, we talked with a few of the students who were excited about trying a more vegetarian-friendly diet. They told us that they wanted to make banana ice cream at home with their families, try Meatless Mondays, and try cooking tofu or other vegan alternatives at home. One of the students was hoping to try a cheese alternative, so we told him about vegan brands or options like nutritional yeast or nuts that could be used in place of dairy cheeses. Overall, we had a great time working with these students, and it was awesome to see how excited and curious they were to learn more about vegetarian and vegan diets. They were very engaged throughout the lesson and learned a lot from each other and from us.

In the oldest age group (14-20 years old), we talked about the agriculture industry, how animal products can harm one’s health, and the ethics of veganism. The maturity of the students was imperative to the discussion of these topics. At first, a few of them were opposed to the idea of going vegetarian because of limiting factors such as the taste of meat and family meals being meat-based. A few of the students knew others who were vegetarian, but many did not understand the reasons why one would choose to stop eating their favorite foods, including fried chicken and burgers. We also discussed how more vegetarian foods are being introduced to the market with the increasing demand for plant-based foods. Because of this, vegetarian products are constantly improving in quality and more closely resembling their non-vegetarian counterparts. Many of these foods can often replicate the experience of non-vegetarian meats or dairy without harming animals, the environment, or our health. Our group also addressed the ethics of eating meat and how unnatural it is to drink cow’s milk when humans are the only species to consume the milk of another animal. We brought up the question: if livestock gets nutrients from plants, why not just consume the plants as a primary source of energy and not get the used energy from a secondary consumer? Their reactions to this logic ranged from more complex questions to silent contemplation. The students responded well to commonly unknown facts about animal agriculture. We tried to give them knowledge about the animal agriculture industry instead of telling them why they should or shouldn’t eat certain foods. Our goal was to educate the students so that when they are able to make decisions on their own, they can use this knowledge and wisdom to make smart choices.

During the lesson, each of the classrooms prepared banana ice cream for a healthy, nondairy dessert. The kids were extremely excited when we announced that we would be making this since many of them remembered it and loved making it last year. Prior to the camp, we froze around 30 bananas (split into 2-3 pieces) and put them into gallon-sized bags. We also purchased sprinkles, chocolate chips, peanut butter, fresh strawberries, and a vegan chocolate spread. We brought along plenty of bowls, spoons, napkins, and other supplies, so everyone could enjoy the dessert. We used a Yonanas machine to prepare the ice cream. The Yonanas machine is a fruit soft serve machine that takes frozen fruits and churns them into delicious, frozen, creamy desserts. The machine can be purchased at many stores or online, and it typically costs around $50. In place of the machine, a blender could be used, however the resulting dessert might be slightly less creamy and a liquid might need to be added to help blend the ingredients. For the dessert, each kid got around 3 pieces of bananas to make their ice cream, which was about one banana total. They then topped it with their toppings of choice and enjoyed the delicious dessert!

We all loved being able to talk with and meet the students at Tuttie’s Place. The students’ excitement and curiosity made this lesson exciting and engaging, and we felt that they were able to learn a lot. While not all of the students were ready to switch to a vegetarian or vegan diet, many of them expressed an interest in it, and we were able to open their minds to the idea. We hope that the students will continue learning more about vegetarianism and we hope to return to Tuttie’s Place again next year to educate the students more about these lifestyles.

Summer Camp Lesson Plan:
http://www.vrg.org/family/TuttiesPlaceLessonPlan.pdf

For more lesson plans, see:
http://www.vrg.org/family/kidsindex.htm#plans

To support this type of outreach, please donate to The Vegetarian Resource Group here:
vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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By Shannon Borgoyn, VRG volunteer

Baltimore Restaurant Week is an attraction for Baltimore residents and tourists alike. Unfortunately, not everybody (namely vegans and vegetarians) can find options at participating restaurants. However, this will change with Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week. Baltimore’s vegan restaurant week will be held August 18-26, 2017 and will feature a variety of vegan and non-vegan restaurants. It is sponsored by VegFund, Yelp, the Restaurant Association of Maryland, HB, the Land of Kush, Golden West Cafe, and the Black Vegetarian Society of Baltimore.

Golden West employee and coordinator of the event Shannon Light Hadley gave me some background information about Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week. The idea of a vegan restaurant week was born of a desire for more vegan options at restaurants throughout Baltimore. She noticed the only vegan option at many restaurants is salad, which often isn’t filling and can lack variety. Hadley wanted to change this. She drew inspiration from Golden West’s vegan weekends, which have occurred twice per year for the last 2-3 years. From these vegan weekends, she got the idea for a vegan restaurant week.

To make this a reality, Hadley got in touch with the owner of the Land of Kush, Naijha Wright-Brown, to form a partnership with them and Golden West Cafe. Together, they’re working to bring Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week to life: Wright-Brown is doing the street work (advertising on the streets, raising funds and grants, etc.) and Hadley handles the computer work (creating advertisements, running the event site, examining restaurant applications, etc.). Really, this is something similar to what they do on a daily basis. Besides being the owner of the Land of Kush, Wright-Brown is also the Executive Director of the Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland and Co-founder of the Vegan Soulfest. As for Hadley, she has a background in graphic design and marketing, has done professional design for ten years, and much more. With all the hard work being put into the event, it’s clear that Hadley and Wright-Brown are extremely passionate about Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week.

The ultimate goal of Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week is to challenge local restaurants to create vegan menu items. Hadley believes that restaurants without vegan options are truly missing out on a lucrative opportunity: having no options means little business from the vegan crowd. Over the years, veganism and vegan foods have become ubiquitous, but there are still many places that don’t yet provide vegan options. Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week could create a better, more welcoming environment for vegans and vegetarians. Usually, Baltimore Restaurant Week features expensive, multi-course meals, but Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week will feature affordable, simple, one-course vegan meals. Hadley hopes the event will arouse people’s curiosity about vegan food. Vegan food sometimes has the stereotypes of being costly and consisting of “rabbit food.” Through Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week, Hadley hopes people will see that vegan food can be as affordable and delicious as mainstream fare. Additionally, Hadley hopes everybody involved with the event will unify into an inclusive community where nobody feels shunned.

Already, the Internet is buzzing about Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week: the Baltimore Sun’s article “Vegan Restaurant Week coming to Baltimore in August” link on Facebook has gotten several likes, shares, reactions, and comments; and Facebook group “Baltimore Vegans” is brimming with excitement. Hadley only expects Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week to get more popular closer to event week. In the future, Hadley “would like to expand into the greater Baltimore area and throughout Maryland.”

Participating locations of Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week include event sponsors the Land of Kush and Golden West Cafe, as well as Big Bean Theory, Sprout, Dangerously Delicious Pies, and many more! A more comprehensive list of participating locations can be found at https://www.mdveganeats.com/; as the event nears, more restaurants will be announced. Currently, Hadley has a Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week Facebook event page in the works, will soon be launching the event’s site, and more. For restaurants interested in participating, the application can be found at https://www.mdveganeats.com/.

Links
Baltimore Vegan Restaurant Week: https://www.mdveganeats.com/
Baltimore Sun article: http://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/dining/baltimore-diner-blog/bs-fe-vegan-restaurant-week-20170705-story.html

For Maryland restaurants that serve vegetarian and vegan food year round, see
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/Maryland.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

leafy greens

Are you looking for new ideas on how to prepare leafy greens? Here’s some recipes from Vegetarian Journal to help you out.

Cooking with Leaves
Chef Nancy Berkoff offers the following recipes:
Dolmathes
Rolled Caesar Salad
Spanish-Influenced Stuffed Cabbage
Lettuce Stuffed with Garlic and White Beans
Romaine Stuffed Cabbage
Almost-Stuffed Cabbage
Peanut-Veggie Rollies
Savory Rice in Lotus Leaves

The Green Scene
Mary Clifford provides these recipes:
Warm Curried Greens and Pasta
Country-Style Greens
Greens and Apples
Braised Bok Choy with Mushrooms
Creamy Rice and Greens Casserole
Greens Quiche

How to Cook Mouthwatering Greens
Cynthia Laier gives readers several recipes:
Watercress Salad with Creamy Ginger Dressing
Tofu-Kale-Mustard-Dill Supper Pie
Bok Choy and Buckwheat Noodles in Garlic Ginger Broth
Szechwan Tempeh with Swiss Chard
Golden Potato and Collard Green Soup

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, go to:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


If you started growing herbs in the spring, you’re probably wondering what to do with them all now. We have you covered. Here’s an article that previously ran in Vegetarian Journal that will give you many ideas.

basil

http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2013issue2/2013_issue2_cooking_with_fresh_herbs.php
Chef Nancy Berkoff offers general information on herbs and these vegan recipes:
Garlic-Parsley Spread
Lemongrass Rice
Whipped Minted Yogurt
Parsley-Cheddar Rice
Vegetable Dumpling Soup
Dill and Mustard Salad Dressing

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, see:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


Nothing beats a delicious cold drink when it’s hot outside. Here’s some recipes for creative beverages from Vegetarian Journal:

orange_juice

Our Coolers are the Coolest!
Christine Day shares recipes for:
Minty Watermelon Cooler
Pineapple Tangerine Margarita
Pina Colada Licuado
Ginger Lemonade
Vampiro
Jamaica Fresca
Horchata

Dessert Smoothies
Ivy Grob serves up smoothies that taste like dessert:
Strawberry Shortcake
Banana Chocolate
Berry Cobbler
Peanut Butter Cup
Peach Pie
Apple Pie

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

By Davin Cheyenne

ladies serving food

Food is one of the few items that connects humans together. It feeds the soul and nourishes the body. When a person lacks that source of energy, discouragement and pain soon follow. To not know where your next meal is coming from or when it will be served is fear in itself. However, I do believe it goes deeper than this. Lack of food is a cut into one’s soul. Without the proper nourishment, one feels deprived deep within. Unfortunately this is not just the case for one or two people in the city of Baltimore.

One in four Baltimoreans are living in poverty according to the U.S. Census. Poverty in Baltimore has increased a whopping 20% since 1981. However with an increase of poverty and homelessness, a helping hand has been there to touch the lives of Baltimore’s most neglected. Since 1981, Our Daily Bread has existed as an employment center which provides help to thousands of people every single day, from hunger, homelessness, and unemployment. It is the place people of Baltimore seek for help and support.

I was very excited to find out that The Vegetarian Resource Group would be giving us interns the opportunity to help prepare and donate vegan casseroles to Our Daily Bread. For many people the idea of donating means to give money, which in many ways is a helpful contribution. However, I feel as though to really connect with those who you’re helping is to visit, and volunteer, and to take a few moments out of our day to prepare food or goodies for those in need.

For me, buying the ingredients, and preparing the casserole in my own home, made me appreciate being able to buy these ingredients because there are those who don’t have a dollar to their name. Preparing the casserole on my table, in my home, made an even meaningful impact on my heart because I know that there are many who eat outside near a trash can with fire in it trying to stay warm. As I finished wrapping the casserole and opened the freezer to let it freeze, the chill made me think of those who had to survive the summer’s humidity. The physical experience of making this casserole was only 30 minutes, but it was more than making food for those in need, it was feeding souls, of humans just like me while feeding my soul as well.
Casey and I chose to make the creamy bean and potato casserole!

As our group of interns stepped into Our Daily Bread the morning of June 27th, we had the pleasure of knowing that many of the staff that provide the food are volunteers, and that over 700 mouths are fed every day! Another thing that caught me off guard was that Our Daily Bread served many vegetarian meals, which included a source of protein, 2 sides of veggies, and one side of fruit, and a dessert.

The Our Daily Bread Employment Center is a lifeline for those in need. To know that I helped contribute to an organization that helps serve meals to Maryland’s hungry, assists homeless men to make the transition to employment, stable housing, and self-sufficiency through the Christopher Place Employment Academy makes me a lifelong supporter, and advocate to encourage all of us to help donate vegan casseroles to Our Daily Bread, or any food center in your community.

If you are in the Baltimore area and would like to volunteer, or even cater vegan casseroles to our Daily Bread, the location is 725 Fallsway, Baltimore, MD, 21202, and they can be reached by telephone at (443) 986-9000. You can also visit their website for vegan recipe options (last three) (created by VRG’s Foodservice Advisor Nancy Berkoff) at http://www.catholiccharities-md.org/our-daily-bread/odb-food-service/favorite-casserole-recipes.html

I hope that by reading this you are encouraged to donate, volunteer, or spend a few moments at Our Daily Bread to really know why making these casseroles really is a life changing experience. If you don’t live in Maryland, please prepare and donate these casseroles to your local nonprofit, which feeds the needy.

Davin Cheyenne and Casey Brown, VRG interns.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Creole-Grilled Tofu Sub Over Greens from The Cinnamon Snail

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate
Chef Tanya’s Kitchen
706 S. Eugene Rd.
Palm Springs, CA 92264
Chef Tanya’s Kitchen offers a selection of incredibly affordable deli sandwiches, including the Daily Grinder and the Bahn Mi and You. You can add soups and salads to your sandwich order, or enjoy them on their own. The Tasty Thai Tofu salad is a local favorite.

Crash Cuisine
630 E. 29th St.
Loveland, CO 80538
Crash Cuisine offers breakfast burritos daily. They make all their own vegan meats and cheeses, including herbed feta and mozzarella. Crash Cuisine also has sandwiches. The pastrami sandwich is a favorite menu item for many patrons.

Recipe Oak Cliff
1831 S. Ewing Ave.
Dallas, TX 75216
Recipe Oak Cliff is a juice and tea bar as well as a deli and grocer. They have a rotating menu, offering different organic juice, smoothies, teas and plant based milks, soups, salads, and sandwiches. Delicious and homemade, Recipe aims to highlight ethnic “soul” food in the food desert of 75216.

Starry Lane Bakery
3925 4th Ave.
San Diego, CA 92103
Starry Lane Bakery is a vegan, allergy-conscious, bakery. Serving everything from cookies and cupcakes to bread, brownies, and bars. Transparency is key there, which is why the ingredients for each item are located on their website at the bottom of the menu page. They even sell raw cookie dough and muffin batters so you can make these treats at home!

Sweet Hart Kitchen
68 Wales Ave.
Toronto, ON M5T 1J3 Canada
Located inside Kensington Market, Sweet Hart kitchen offers a wide variety of vegan baked goods and sweets. Menu items are classified as bite-sized, squares, cake cups, and cake. The cookie dough cake cup and the chocolate frosted brownie square are popular.

The Cinnamon Snail
City Acres Market
70 Pine Street
New York, NY 10005
This second location in the Wall Street section of NYC is open daily for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Enjoy Blue Corn Pancakes, Chipotle Seitan Breakfast Burritos, Cambodian Crispy Tofu, French Lentil Burger, various Fries, and much more.

Vitality Juice & Smoothie Bar
22 S. High St.
Dublin, OH 43017
This vegan juice bar serves fresh and nutritious drinks. They offer a variety of cold pressed juices with flavors including Apple Pie, Vanilla Dream, and Supreme Green. In addition to juice, they offer multiple smoothies such as PB & J, a Green Tea Cooler, Crazy Monkey (a coffee flavor), and multiple fruit options. Their drinks are all vegan, soy-free, and gluten-free.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Congratulations to the JAINA Eco-Vegan Group that had a wonderful pro-vegan display at the Jaina Convention recently held in Edison, New Jersey. Most Jains are vegetarian; however, they are often hesitant to become vegan. This display shared all the reasons to give up dairy products (Jains that are vegetarian do not consume eggs). Vegan alternatives were also shown.

The Vegetarian Resource Group also exhibited at this meeting and provided free vegan handouts including this article that was well received by attendees:
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2009issue4/2009_issue4_calcium_indian.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Vegetarian Resource Group now has a separate Facebook Group for Veggie Parents and Kids. Recent topics brought up include:

Vegan Cookbooks for Kids
Support with Raising a Vegan Infant
Advice on Environmentally-Friendly Diapers for Newborn
Recommendations for an Air Fryer
Veggie-Friendly Summer Camps
Vegan Art Supplies
Where to Buy Vegan Ballet and Tap Shoes

To join The VRG Parents and Kids Group on Facebook, visit:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRGparentsandkids/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Doshi backpack

Doshi backpack

Today many people use backpacks for work and leisure. You can now purchase a wide range of creatively designed vegan backpacks. Here’s a few examples of what’s available:

https://doshi.shop/
Doshi offers stylish business backpacks for men and women that you would feel comfortable carrying into a formal office. They are made out of vegan Microfiber PU leather.

https://www.gunasthebrand.com/collections/backpacks
Gunas offers backpacks in various colors for women.

http://mattandnat.com/shop/handbags/backpacks?___SID=U
Matt and Natt offers a wide range of colorful backpacks for men and women. Of note: they are committed to using linings only made out of 100% recycled plastic bottles.

https://www.queenbee-creations.com/collections/backpacks
Queen Bee backpacks for women are stylish and have a unique design.

http://www.slappa.com/catalog/backpacks/?mytabsmenu=1
Slappa offers laptop backpacks.

http://www.spire-bags.com/laptop_backpacks.php
Spire offers laptop backpacks.

http://thevegetariansite.com/cgi-bin/miva?Merchant2/merchant.mv+Screen=PROD&Store _Code=S&Product_Code=Hempmania+Backpack&Category_Code=accessoriesThe Vegetarian Site offers a hemp backpack.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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If you are attending Artscape (an incredible 3-day free event with music, movies, art, theater, and more in Baltimore City), you may want to check out these two events featuring vegan food!

Vegan Art-Stravaganza will display art by vegan artists at the Thrive community center in the Charles North neighborhood of Baltimore, and have vegan food available for purchase. See:
www.facebook.com/thrivebaltimore
Friday-Sunday (July 21-23), 12-6pm
6 E. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, MD

Red Emma’s is also having vegan food specials on Friday, July 21:
Join the Red Emma’s coop for Happy Hour from 5-8PM, featuring $1 off all responsibly-sourced beer, wine, and craft cocktails! Plus vegan food specials, and a chance to see the “I Love Being Black” art demonstration by Baltimore photographer SHAN.
www.redemmas.org
Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse is located at 30 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, MD

For details on Artscape, see:
http://www.artscape.org/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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By Casey Brown, VRG Intern

Catholic Charities of Baltimore offers beneficial programs to individuals in need throughout Maryland. Our Daily Bread Employment Center is one of their programs, which provides assistance to individuals living in poverty. This center assists individuals by providing them with hot meals, job training, job placement, and other services to help them transition to a more stable lifestyle. The Hot Meal Program serves over 700 people per day, and the center relies on donations and volunteers to make this possible.

VRG’s Food Service Advisor Chef Nancy Berkoff created three vegan casserole recipes to include on Our Daily Bread’s site, so others could prepare and donate these options. The recipes include a Sweet Potato and Black Bean Casserole, a Brunswick Stew, and a Creamy Bean and Potato Casserole with Carrots. During each of my visits to Our Daily Bread, the volunteers have expressed the need for more vegetarian options. They stated that around ? of the individuals who come to the center prefer the vegetarian casseroles. This past week during my visit, the volunteer mentioned that macaroni is the most common vegetarian dish that is donated. She said that they don’t often have enough of the other vegetarian casseroles to serve, although they would like to be able to. She stated that the Sweet Potato and Black Bean Casserole is well-liked, however it is not frequently donated.

As an intern with The VRG, I visited Our Daily Bread twice last summer to donate casseroles. I was excited to have the opportunity to visit again this year and be able to prepare another casserole. This year, another intern and I both prepared the Creamy Bean and Potato Casserole with Carrots. This only took me about 10 minutes to prepare and an additional 20 minutes to cook! All of the ingredients were canned, so it was easy to make and there was minimal mess to clean up afterwards. It was also a low cost option. To prepare the dish, I simply opened all of the cans and drained the appropriate ones (all except for the tomatoes). Then I layered them in the casserole pan, topped it with pepper, and put the dish in the oven. It is that simple! This is such an easy dish to prepare, so I encourage everyone to try it out! I plan to prepare some of the Sweet Potato and Black Bean Casseroles next time since I now know that they’re a popular dish.

Our Daily Bread is always looking for more volunteers to join their Hot Meal Program. They need individuals to help serve the meals in the center and prepare casseroles to donate. If you would like to get involved with this organization, visit Catholic Charities website here. If you, your church, synagogue, animal rights group, or another organization is looking for a way to get involved and help the community, then this is a great opportunity! You can commit to cooking vegetarian casseroles for them on a regular basis, so they are able to offer more of these dishes. If you are not located in the Baltimore area, then you can contact your local soup kitchen to see if you can prepare one of the vegetarian casserole recipes for them.

The recipes can all be found here: http://www.catholiccharities-md.org/our-daily-bread/odb-food-service/favorite-casserole-recipes.html The last three options were developed by VRG Foodservice Advisor Chef Nancy Berkoff RD, and are vegan).

If you are not in Maryland, we encourage you to donate the vegan casseroles to your local hot meals program.

To support VRG outreach, please donate at:
vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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By Jeanne Yacoubo, MS

The Vegetarian Resource Group placed two calls separated by at least three weeks to each of six Souper Salad locations, all of which are located in the south central and southwest United States. By far, most Souper Salad restaurants are in Texas so we sought information from three different Texas locations.

It became apparent after our first call that the monthly menu posted on the Souper Salad website may not be completely reflective of what is actually served at a specific location. Visitors using the online menu (formatted as a calendar) should consider it a guide and expect differences. Since the menus are posted on the corporate website as PDF files which change monthly, visitors should go to https://www.soupersalad.com/menu/ and click on the large red button positioned in the screen’s center to download the current menu.

As we spoke to each manager, we rephrased our questions during the conversations in different ways to increase the likelihood that our meaning would be accurately conveyed and yield correct information. For example, when we asked “Which soup is all-vegetable?” and were provided the name of one such soup, we probed further: “Does that soup contain any animal ingredients at all such as dairy, chicken stock or meat flavors?”
Often we would name a particular menu item in our questioning and suggest some target ingredients in order to prompt our listener with enough background so we would be more likely to get yes/no answers. Our goal was to make it as easy as possible to collect information quickly.

We would say, for instance, after being told that the butter bean soup is all-vegetable: “Does the butter bean soup contain butter or any other dairy?” We have found that specific questions formulated to result in a yes or no answer produce more immediate responses stated without hesitation indicating greater reliability than the response to this type of question: “Which soup contains no dairy including butter?” which requires more thought and is more prone to error by unintentional omission.

On the other hand, we do not recommend general, open-ended questions such as “What do you serve that’s vegan?” because in fast-paced conversations with busy managers, callers (or diners) shouldn’t assume that (1) “vegan” means the same thing to both speaker and listener; nor that (2) managers have a ready, mental list of all vegan items or a vegan-customized print menu.

We’d recommend that guests pre-identify 2-3 items which appear vegan from their names and inquire initially about them. Then, once satisfied that the received information is reliable but still interested in other menu offerings, proceed to inquire about other dishes one by one as we have described above. In all cases speak to the manager and/or chef.

Here is a summary of what we learned from calling the same six locations once in May 2017 and again in June 2017. This calling strategy enabled us not only to confirm information relayed to us in May but also inquire about June’s menu items. We also tried to engage the managers in longer discussions during the June calls in order to obtain more information.
From our May conversations we learned:

Three Texas locations: Vegetable, Vegetable Lentil, Butter Bean and Minestrone Soups are vegan. The Gazpacho Salad is also all-vegetable. One Texas manager told us that the Red Beans and Rice Soup contains pork and the Vegetable Chili Soup contains hamburger.

New Mexico: The Vegetable and Butter Bean Soups are all-vegetable. The Gazpacho Salad and Marinated Mushrooms are also vegan.

Colorado and Arizona: The Vegetable and Vegetable Lentil Soups are vegan.

Here’s what our June followup calls yielded:

Three Texas locations: Managers at two locations said the Potato Leek Soup contains cream. An employee at a third Texas Souper Salad restaurant said that it did not. All confirmed that the Minestrone Soup was vegan.
We were informed by one Texas manager that the “Veg.” in the soup named “Veg. Black Bean” refers to “vegetarian” and not “vegetable.” She said that this soup was vegan. However, a Texas manager at another location said the Veg. Black Bean Soup contained a ham base. A third Texas manager told us that he did not offer it since it was not popular among his clientele and consequently did not know.
Managers at all three said the Gazpacho and Cucumber Onion Salads are vegan. Two managers said the Quinoa & Fruit Salad is vegan. One Texas location served a vegan Quinoa & Black Bean Salad instead of the Quinoa & Fruit Salad. The manager at that location added that the cranberry vinaigrette; house vinaigrette; balsamic vinegar; and oil & red wine are vegan dressings.

The Very Berry Strawberry Bread contains egg according to one manager. Two other Texas managers stated that it contains milk. The Corn Bread contains milk according to two managers; a third said it has egg and milk.
When we asked about potato salad, one Texas manager said it was vegan while the others stated it contained cheese, egg or mayonnaise.

(There are several potato salads on Souper Salad menus each made with different ingredients rendering some non-vegan. One variety appears vegan. See below for more information about potato salads.)
New Mexico: A Souper Salad manager told us that the Potato Leek Soup contains cream. She confirmed that the Minestrone Soup is vegan.

She looked further and informed us that both the Minestrone and Vegetable Soups at Souper Salad contain “chicken-style vegetable base” supplied by Custom Culinary. The VRG looked at Custom Culinary’s website where this soup base is described as all-vegetable: http://www.customculinary.com/bases/vegetable-bases/index.cfm

We also learned from the New Mexico manager that the Veg. Black Bean Soup is made with all-vegetable mirepoix.

The Gazpacho, Cucumber Onion and Quinoa & Fruit Salads are vegan.

The Very Berry Strawberry Bread and the Lemon Bread contain egg. The Corn Bread contains milk and egg. The Sponge Cake contains egg.
The Red Potato Salad is vegan while the Mustard Potato Salad contains egg.

Colorado:
A manager at a Colorado Souper Salad was not offering Potato Leek Soup when we called and did not know if it was vegan. The Vegetable Lentil Soup is vegan.

The Gazpacho and Cucumber Onion Salads are vegan. No Quinoa & Fruit Salad was offered at this Colorado Souper Salad when we called and the manager did not know about its ingredients.

The Very Berry Strawberry and Corn Breads contain egg.

The Loaded Potato Salad contains mayonnaise and bacon. The Mustard Potato Salad contains mayonnaise.

Arizona:
A manager at an Arizona Souper Salad told us that the Potato Leek Soup contains cream and milk. The Minestrone Soup is vegan. The manager informed us that Vegetable Lentil Soup would not be offered later in the month and did not know about its ingredients.

The Gazpacho, Cucumber Onion and Quinoa & Fruit Salads are vegan.

The manager stated that no Souper Salad breads are vegan.

He stated that the Loaded Potato Salad is made with sour cream, butter and cheese. The baked potato bar provides guests the opportunity to customize a vegan baked potato.

In-Store Ingredient Signage:

The Vegetarian Resource Group posed a general question about signage to managers at all six Souper Salad locations that we surveyed for this article. Here are their responses:
Texas: One manager told us that “there are ingredient signs on the walls” while two others said that there were no signs.

New Mexico: A manager informed us that “everything except the salad bar is labeled.”

Colorado: The manager relayed to us that “ingredient information is at the register.”

Arizona: A manager stated: “Ingredient listings for soups and pastas are in the store.”

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group research, join at: http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

For information about other chain restaurants, see: http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

To find vegetarian and vegan restaurants in the USA and Canada, see: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Sunday, October 22, 2017 at 6pm

The Vegetarian Resource Group will host a vegan dinner at LYFE Kitchen in Chicago (at Fairbanks and Ontario) on Sunday, October 22, 2017 during the annual meeting of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Meet VRG advisors Reed Mangels PhD, RD, Catherine Conway MS RD, Charles Stahler, Debra Wasserman, and vegetarian dietitians from around the country. The public is welcome.

MENU
Edamame Hummus
Kale and Cranberry Salad
Ancient Grain Stir-Fry Bowl with stir-fried vegetables, beefless tips, quinoa, black rice,
cilantro, and sweet chili-ginger sauce
Vegan Thai Red Curry Bowl with garlic-lime tofu, broccoli, eggplant, peppers, peas,
whole grain wheatberries, Thai basil, and coconut curry sauce
Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookie
Tea or Coffee
The meal will be served family style. Note: Seating is limited!

TO RESERVE
Send $35 per person (includes tax and tip) with names to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203; Call (410) 366-8343 9am-5pm Mon.-Fri. EST to charge over the phone. Or pay at www.vrg.org/donate and write Chicago Dinner in the Comments.

# Attending X $35/person = $_____
Donation towards professional outreach: $_____
Total enclosed: $_____

Names of attendees:
Address:
Email:
Phone:

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Our Daily Bread in Baltimore, Maryland serves about 700 needy people per day, with over ten percent asking for a vegetarian option. Many volunteers and institutions volunteer and donate casseroles. VRG’s Chef Nancy Berkoff, RD tested three quantity recipes in a senior center in Los Angeles, and now these have been added to the recipes on the Our Daily Bread website. Volunteers are needed to cook and bring in the casseroles. If you are not in the Baltimore area, you may want to prepare these recipes for your local food charity.

See:
http://www.catholiccharities-md.org/our-daily-bread/odb-food-service/favorite-casserole-recipes.html and
http://www.catholiccharities-md.org/our-daily-bread/odb-food-service/food-donations.html

The recipes for Sweet Potato and Black Bean Casserole, Brunswick Stew, and Creamy Bean and Potato Casserole with Carrots are below.

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Casserole
Serves 8-10

Vegetable oil spray
1 cup minced onions
½ cup diced bell pepper (red or green)
2 cloves minced garlic or 3 teaspoons dried, granulated garlic
1 cup water
4 cups peeled, diced fresh sweet potatoes
6 cups drained, canned or cooked black beans
3 cups drained and chopped canned tomatoes
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or parsley or 1 Tablespoon dried parsley
1 Tablespoon ground black pepper
2 teaspoons hot sauce

In a large pot, spray vegetable oil and allow pot to heat. Add onion, pepper, and garlic and cook for about 3 minutes, until vegetables soften.

Add one cup of cold water and the sweet potatoes. Cook, covered, until the potatoes are just tender, about 10 minutes.

Add the black beans and tomatoes and allow to simmer until the potatoes begin to fall apart. Stir in black pepper and hot sauce and remove from heat.

Brunswick Stew a la Vegan
Serves 8-10

Vegetable oil spray
2 cups diced onions
3 cloves minced fresh garlic or 3 teaspoons dried granulated garlic
2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons dried sage or dried parsley
4 cups vegetable broth or tomato juice
1 pound unpeeled, chopped red or white rose potatoes
1½ cup sliced fresh carrots (can use frozen, thawed carrots)
4 cups thawed, frozen lima or butter beans, thawed (can also used drained, canned beans)
2 cups chopped, but not drained, canned tomatoes
2 cups cut corn (thawed, if frozen, drained, if canned)
1 Tablespoon soy sauce
3 teaspoons red or white vinegar

In a large pot, spray oil and allow pot to heat. Sauté onion until soft (about 3 minutes). Add garlic and sauté for one minute. Stir in flour and sage or parsley and stir (this creates a roux, a thickening agent) until combined.

Add broth or tomato juice and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Lower heat, add potatoes, carrots, and beans. Cover and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Add tomatoes and corn and simmer, uncovered, until all veggies are soft (about 15 minutes).

Stir in soy sauce, hot sauce, and vinegar and allow to cook for 3 minutes. Serve hot.

Creamy Bean and Potato Casserole with Carrots
Serves 8-10

8 cups prepared vegetarian refried beans
4 cups canned, drained sliced potatoes
3 cups canned, drained sliced carrots
2 cups canned tomatoes with juice
1 Tablespoon black or white pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

In a large baking dish, place a thin, even layer of refried beans. Top with a thin layer of potatoes, then carrots, then tomatoes. Repeat until all ingredients are used. Sprinkle pepper on top. Cover and bake in oven for 15-20 minutes, or until thoroughly heated.

Note: many brands of canned refried beans are vegetarian, having no lard or animal fat; just read the label and ensure vegetable oil is used rather than lard. If preparing your own refried beans, mash cooked, red or white beans with a small amount of oil (hot water may be used rather than oil).

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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When you #StartWithaSmile on #PrimeDay, Amazon donates to Vegetarian Resource Group. Shop for great deals at smile.amazon.com/ch/52-1279034

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

DOLE_SweetFrog_Graphic

According to Sweet Frog, they have added Dole Whip, which they say is vegan, to their offerings. For more information, see:
http://sweetfrog.com/yogurt/flavors
http://www.dolesoftserve.com/prod-info.cfm
Please note that sugar appears to be the first ingredient.

The contents of this posting, our website, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Baked Roots Bar
970 SE Madison St.
Portland, OR 97214
Enjoy this traditional American restaurant which has a vegan menu based on fries with flavor adaptions from all seven continents. Their menu is oil-free!

Fry Baby Donut Co.
336 Elmwood Ave.
Buffalo, NY 14201
Fry Baby Donut Co. donuts are handmade with love. The flavors are unique and creative, including bubble gum donuts and S’mores donuts.

Good Grains
4134 Dundas St. West
Toronto, ON M8X 1X3 Canada
Good Grains specializes in creating dishes using legumes, veggies, grains, fruits, and spices. Most (but not all) menu items are soy-free, nut-free, gluten-free, and free of refined sugars. The Golden Cauliflower Curry is an excellent choice for a main dish. Good Grains also offers FlatPacks2GO, which are prepared frozen dishes you can heat and eat at home.

Pure Kitchen Organic Vegan
3214 W. Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33609
Serves lunch, drinks and coffee. Enjoy soups, salads, and a variety of dishes such as barbecue temepeh and portobello mushrooms, bento boxes, and chickpea couscous bowl with tahini dressing. Vegan Grab&Go and weekly meal delivery is available also.

Rosie’s Eatery
1726 Avenue Rd.
Toronto, ON M5M 3Y6 Canada
In addition to being vegan, all menu items are gluten-free! Rosie’s offers a wide selection of baked goods, yoghurt bowls, oatmeals, salads, soups, toasts, and smoothies. The soups and salads are daily specials.

Sweet Alchemy Bakery and Café
45 Upper Main St.
Essex Junction, VT 05452
Bakery and café focused on creating amazing flavors, sourcing ingredients thoughtfully, and crafting with joy. Items available include cinnamon buns, cookies, cake, and more. They also offer savory dishes.

The Greyhound Café
81 Lancaster Ave.
Malvern, PA 19355
Brunch is available on Saturdays and Sundays. There are several different menus to choose from. They have a lunch menu, a Texican Menu, an Italian menu, and a pizza menu. The Greyhound Cafe also serves desserts! Popular menu items include Huevos Rancheros, Sofritos, Calzones, and No-Bake Cheesecake.

The Juice Theory
87 Brighton Ave.
Long Branch, NJ 07740
The Juice Theory is 100% organic! In addition to delicious juices, The Juice Theory offers sandwiches, salads, and sides. They have a build your own salad option as well. Many folks enjoy the Veganwich and the Tex-Mex Wrap.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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For many years, The Vegetarian Resource Group has created materials specifically geared towards teens written by young veggie activists (many of whom have volunteered or interned with VRG). Our online teen section can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/teen/

You’ll find an FAQ section that answers a wide range of questions teens might have including:

-How do I start a vegan/vegetarian club at my school?
-What are some Vegan Snacks for Athletes?
-I am thinking of joining 4-H. I am vegan. What kinds of activities could I do?
-I’ll be looking at colleges this spring. How do I find a veg-friendly college?
-My family doesn’t have much money. I’d like to be vegan but I’ve heard it’s expensive to buy all the special food you need. Is this true?
– How Do You Respond To People Unfamiliar With or Opposed To Your Dietary Lifestyle?
– How Can I Start a School or Community Garden?
– What should I serve to non-vegans when I am hosting a party as a vegan/vegetarian?
– Why don’t vegans use leather, silk, or wool?
– I’m going to a banquet for the soccer team and I’m the only vegetarian on the team. How do I let the caterer know that I’ll need something different to eat?

To join The Vegetarian Resource Group, please visit:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

The Olivia Heeled Sandal in black from MooShoes

The Olivia Heeled Sandal in black from MooShoes

Vegan sneakers for adults and kids in low-top, mid-top, and high-top styles. They have a storefront in Los Angeles, CA. See: keepcompany.com

MooShoes has storefronts in New York City, NY and Los Angeles, CA and you can also purchase shoes online here: www.mooshoes.com They offer a wide range of sandals, sneakers, and shoes for men and women.

Pangea: The Vegan Store offers running shoes for men and women. See: http://www.veganstore.com

Sudo Shoes has a store in Cambridge, MA and an online store here: http://www.sudoshoes.com/ They offer a wide variety of shoes, sandals, and sneakers.

Vegan Essentials has a storefront in Waukesha, WI and an online store found here: http://www.veganessentials.com/ They offer dress shoes for men.

The Vegetarian Site offers shoes, sandals, and hiking boots for men and women. Their online site is:
http://www.thevegetariansite.com

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Vegetarian Resource Group is an activist non-profit organization that does outreach all-year-long. For example, today we are giving a several hour presentation on veganism to 10 University of Maryland Dietetic Interns (all of whom are not vegetarian and will soon be practicing dietitians). VRG tables at different events throughout the USA and also sends literature free of charge to other groups/individuals doing educational activities in schools, hospitals, camps, restaurants, libraries, etc. Our ability to continue doing this depends on people like you! Your donations allow us to promote the vegan message whenever we’re called upon for assistance. Please consider becoming a monthly or quarterly donor to The Vegetarian Resource Group.

Thanks so much for your support. You can become a monthly or quarterly donor online here: vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Are you looking for some fun veggie-themed activities for your kids to do this summer? VRG has you covered. Here are some of the materials we have available:

Veggie-Friendly Memory Cards
http://www.vrg.org/family/memory_cards.php

Veggie Counting Game for Kids
http://www.vrg.org/family/memory_cards_math_game1.php

Vegetarian Quiz for Young and Old
http://www.vrg.org/game/

Veggie Videos: Watch Winning Videos from VRG’s Annual Video Contest
http://www.vrg.org/veg_videos.php

My Vegan Plate Coloring Page
http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/MyVeganPlateCP.pdf

To support VRG outreach, please donate:
vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

VRG summer 2017 interns

The Vegetarian Resource Group does outreach and research all year-round and we couldn’t do it all without our wonderful high school and college interns/volunteers. Presently four young adults are working in our Baltimore office (photo shows from left to right Shannon, Devin, Julia, and Casey) and others do work for VRG long-distance.

Among their tasks are staffing VRG booths throughout the USA, preparing vegan meals for homeless individuals in Baltimore City, reviewing new vegan products (someone has to do that tough job!), writing up entries for our online restaurant guide, reviewing scientific studies on vegan diets, plus so much more.

To support our intern program, consider donating to VRG at:
www.vrg.org/donate

To join The Vegetarian Resource Group, visit:
Join VRG

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Screen Shot 2017-06-26 at 4.41.13 PM

The Vegetarian Resource Group has an entire section in Spanish on www.vrg.org that includes plenty of vegan recipes, nutrition information, links to other organizations, articles, and more.

The Spanish section can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/information_in_Spanish.htm

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

May Wah Purple Legs

Fire up the grill, it’s BBQ season and the vegan chicken legs have arrived! As we approach our 22nd anniversary, May Wah vegan chicken legs continue to conquer the vegan barbecues during this grilling season. Save 10% off your $50 purchase today! Promo code JULY42017, ends July 7th.

May Wah is most popular source for delicious meat alternatives including our Vegan Sweet and Sour Citrus Spare Ribs, Ginger Chicken, Spicy Gong Bao Chicken, and our ever-popular Delicious Chicken Legs. Additionally, our products were recently elegantly presented to each guest at PETA’s Animals’ Party on Capitol Hill.

Our products are convenient, delicious, and most important, we can ship anywhere in the USA. Purchase today and show off your vegan grilling skills! Visit http://www.maywahnyc.com/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group


by Shannon Borgoyn, VRG volunteer

Sunny 1-Bar

I love chocolate, so I was excited to review Amy’s brand chocolate bars: Amy’s Dreamy and Amy’s Sunny.

According to its wrapper, Amy’s Dreamy candy bar is a filling of “chocolate creamy nougat covered with dark chocolate.” Upon biting into it, I experienced a pleasantly sweet dark chocolate shell. Following the dark chocolate shell, the chocolate creamy nougat met my tongue, it was chocolatey and creamy, but I also noted it had a slightly sticky consistency (vaguely similar to caramel). The nougat was slightly sweeter than the dark chocolate outer shell and was scrumptious. One Amy’s Dreamy candy bar is 150 calories; a serving is one bar.

Amy’s Sunny candy bar is labeled as “coconut & roasted almonds covered in dark chocolate.” When I bit into the Sunny bar, I closed my eyes and savored the dark chocolate outer shell. After the dark chocolate said goodbye, the coconut greeted me: “Hi, hello,” it said, “I’m here. My name is Coconut and I’ll be your flavor today.” Compared to the Dreamy bar, the Sunny bar’s coconut filling was subtly sweet; roasted almond bits were interspersed throughout the coconut. One Amy’s Sunny candy bar is 170 calories; a serving is one bar.

Amy’s candy bars were delicious and sweet. They are so reminiscent of mainstream candy that I felt like I was eating my favorite candies. Most notably, Amy’s labels these candy bars as “vegan”: there is no dairy or eggs listed in the ingredients for both bars. If you are looking for a sweet alternative to your favorite candies, I strongly suggest Amy’s Sunny and Dreamy candy bars.

For more information, check out these links:
Amy’s website: https://www.amys.com/
Amy’s Dreamy candy bar: https://www.amys.com/our-foods/dreamy-candy-vegan
Amy’s Sunny candy bar: https://www.amys.com/our-foods/sunny-candy-vegan

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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We recently received information on a new product called Noshi Food Paint. According to the manufacturer, these are “brightly colored organic purées to paint on top of your food in three delicious,kid-approved flavors, including Strawberry, Peach & Blueberry. Suitable for kids aged 6 months and up.Noshi Food Paint is made in the USA, and all packaging is recyclable.”

We think you and your kids could have a lot of fun using this product! Noshi Food Paint is launching this month into Safeway and Albertsons stores nationwide. It is also available on Amazon.com

Information on the company can be found here: http://www.noshiforkids.com/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

pexels-photo-29737

The Vegetarian Resource Group is once again sponsoring a video contest. We will be awarding one $200 scholarship plus two $100 awards. The deadline for entries this year is July 15, 2017.

Create and submit a video relating what you want to tell others about veganism. Some possible topics: food, nutrition, your feelings about veganism and/or vegetarianism, water usage and veganism, veganism and animal rights, or other veggie topics which appeal to you. Humor and feelings are appreciated. All videos should be positive, not be critical of anyone, and not include any footage of animal cruelty. You may submit a video you have already made.

Aspects of judging include accuracy and judges wanting to share the video with others. Entrants give permission to The Vegetarian Resource Group to post and share the video, to link to and from the video, and share the video with the media.

To see the video contest rules, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/videoscholarship.php

Previous wining videos can be found here:
http://www.vrg.org/veg_videos.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Colorful paper weight rocks

If you’ve ever staffed a veggie booth at an outdoor event, you realize that sometimes it can be windy and you definitely need paper weights to old down your handouts. VRG intern Casey Brown and former VRG intern Julia Mathews spent an evening painting rocks with fruits and veggies to use at future events where The Vegetarian Resource Group exhibits. They go the idea from VRG volunteer Whitney Blomquist. We thought some of you would want to do the same. You can always donate them to your local vegan/animal rights/environmental group in your area.

To support VRG outreach, please donate at:
http://vrg.org/donate

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Central PA VegFest

By Casey Brown, Intern

The Vegetarian Resource Group recently had a booth at the Central PA Vegfest in Lancaster, PA. This was the first annual Vegfest in this area, and it did not disappoint! The event included many speakers, vendors, non-profit organizations, and other activities including community yoga. It was fun for the whole family and had activities for children to get involved.

While here, the other interns and I were able to meet with and speak to numerous individuals from the area. Many people who visited our booth were new to vegetarianism/veganism or were interested in transitioning. They were excited to receive a variety of our resources so they could learn more about the lifestyle. Our Vegetarian Journals were a favorite among everyone since they include many recipes and product reviews. The “My Vegan Plate” handouts were also popular because they are a great visual tool to help plan out balanced meals. VRG’s Pennsylvania dining guides went quickly since everyone was interested in learning more about veg-friendly restaurants in the area. Multiple parents stopped by looking for more information on how to help their teenager’s transition to vegetarianism or veganism. We were able to recommend our “Vegetarianism in a Nutshell” and “Vegan Nutrition for Teenagers” brochures to provide these parents with more knowledge on these lifestyles. We also had a 12 year-old boy stop by since he had recently gone vegan. He was very interested in gathering more resources and learning more about volunteer opportunities for children his age, and he was excited to have found our group! We also spoke with a cardiologist who recommends vegan diets to the majority of his patients. He was thrilled to have found our handouts and knew they would be perfect guides to provide to his patients since he has limited time to meet with them. A dietitian also stopped by to pick up some resources she can refer her patients to. It is always exciting to meet health professionals that are educated about vegetarian/vegan diets.
Overall, we had a great time at the event and were able to connect with many individuals. We met many long-time vegans, individuals interested in transitioning, and people there in support of their vegan/vegetarian friends. We were glad we were able to provide everyone with more information and resources.

We were so grateful to be a part of Lancaster’s first annual Vegfest and we cannot wait to attend many more! The next event The Vegetarian Resource Group will be at is Richmond Vegfest in Richmond, VA on June 24, 2017. We hope to see many of you there!

To volunteer at future VRG booths, contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org.

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group outreach, donate at www.vrg.org/donate

Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

MellowMushroom

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

Annica Kreider, VP of Brand Development for Mellow Mushroom told us in 2014 that the chain was considering a few more vegetarian and vegan menu options and that they were hopeful that they would be added within a year. http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/12/17/vegan-options-at-mellow-mushroom/

We recently checked the company website in March 2017 and viewed a “Herb Veggie Burger” featuring quinoa and kale. Roasted Potatoes also appeared on the menu.

We noticed in May 2017 that the Herb Veggie Burger was no longer on the corporate menu. http://mellowmushroom.com/corpmenu

We wondered if it had been removed from all locations. The Vegetarian Resource Group called several Mellow Mushroom restaurants around the country to find out.
We were surprised that all six Mellows that we had contacted stated that they served the Herb Veggie Burger. What was even more surprising were the different answers we received when we asked if this menu offering was all-vegetable (i.e., vegan).

We first called three Mellow restaurants in the Maryland-Virginia-Washington, DC area. The managers at all of these locations stated that they served the Herb Veggie Burger.

The managers at the Washington, DC and Maryland stores put us on long holds and checked on its ingredients. They both stated that the Herb Veggie Burger was all-vegetable. They also stated that the bun on which it is served contained no dairy nor L-cysteine.

A Virginia Mellow manager said quite the opposite. “The Herb Veggie Burger is not vegan because it contains egg as a binder.” He voiced agreement with the others saying its bun was dairy- and L-cysteine-free. However, unlike the first two managers, he stated that the bun is automatically buttered; guests must request that butter be left off.

We next ventured West and called three more Mellow Mushroom restaurants in Utah, Arizona, and Iowa.

A Utah Mellow Mushroom employee, upon hearing our call requesting a vegan menu item, called a vegan employee to the phone. She put us on hold several times during our conversation to check and double check for us as we repeated our question in several different ways asking specifically about egg and dairy. Finally she stated that dairy, but not egg, was in the Herb Veggie Burger.

An Arizona Mellow Mushroom manager stated just the opposite: the Herb Veggie Burger contained egg but not dairy.

The Iowa manager concurred with the Virginian and Arizonan stating that egg served as a binder in the Herb Veggie Burger. He also noted the automatic bun buttering; visitors needed to request that it be left off.

The Iowa manager volunteered additional information: all of the Mellow menu is “veganizable” except for four items:
• Herb Veggie Burger (egg)
• Pesto (animal rennet)
• Holy Shiitake Pie (butter)
• Stuffed Portobello Mushroom (butter)

Five of the six Mellow Mushroom restaurants which we contacted provided the same information about the Roasted Potatoes: They are prepared in the oven away from meat items. They are roasted with fresh olive oil and no butter. However, the Virginia manager told us that the potatoes were prepared with butter.
Given the variety of responses from these six Mellow Mushroom restaurants, The VRG called them again in June 2017.

Usually the host/hostess answered the phone. He or she would put us on hold; relay our question to the kitchen and/or general manager; and get back with a response. Our goal was to find unanimous agreement among all of the restaurants since we didn’t have an answer from the corporate office. Here is what we learned the second time around:

• The Maryland Mellow Mushroom told us that egg, but not dairy, was in the Herb Veggie Burger. Butter is automatically spread on its bun unless requested otherwise. There is no butter in the Roasted Potatoes.
• A Washington, DC Mellow Mushroom announced that the Herb Veggie Burger had just been taken off of the corporate menu and they had no more left in stock. No butter was used to prepare the Roasted Potatoes.
• A Virginia location of this chain stated that Herb Veggie Burgers had just been removed from the menu. There was no butter on the Roasted Potatoes.
• This time, the host at the Utah location stated that the Herb Veggie Burger had egg in it. He added that there was no butter on the Roasted Potatoes.
• No more Herb Veggie Burgers were available at an Arizona Mellow Mushroom location. The host also said that there was no butter on the Roasted Potatoes.
• An employee at an Iowa Mellow Mushroom told us that there was no egg nor dairy in the Herb Veggie Burger. Recalling what we had been previously told by the manager at that same location last month, we asked him to check into it again. He returned from a brief hold stating that egg served as a binder in the Herb Veggie Burger.

Thinking that we had collected all of the information needed in our second round of calls, we were surprised to hear next, upon asking in Iowa about the Roasted Potatoes, that a butter spray containing “natural butter flavor” and milk was used to coat the potatoes before they were roasted.

So we went back again and called the first five Mellow Mushroom restaurants to find out if they used a butter spray. This time we asked specifically about a butter spray (not just butter).

• The Maryland Mellow Mushroom hostess told us “no.” We asked her to check with her manager. She returned stating that she had checked with both the kitchen and general managers who concurred: no butter or butter spray.
• The Washington, DC Mellow Mushroom host put us on hold then initially told us that a butter spray was used on the potatoes. When we probed further to see if dairy were also in the butter spray, he transferred us to the manager. She stated that the spray had neither butter nor dairy; it contained only soy and canola oils.
• A Virginia Mellow Mushroom hostess told us that she would check with the kitchen and returned saying that butter spray was applied to the potatoes. Then we asked if dairy were in the spray. She said that she would check again and then she put the receiver down. After being disconnected, we called back and asked to speak to the manager. The person identified herself as the manager. We asked “Is there milk in the butter spray on the potatoes?” I heard her relay my question as “Is there milk in the potatoes?” She returned by saying “There’s no milk in the potatoes.” I repeated my initial question. I heard her correctly relay the question the second time. She came back on and said that there was milk in the butter spray used on the potatoes.
• In Utah, the host put us on hold and later said that there was not any butter spray used. When we indicated that other Mellow Mushroom restaurants do use a butter spray he called a kitchen employee over to the phone. The kitchen employee reiterated that there was no butter spray used on the potatoes.
• A hostess at a Mellow Mushroom in Arizona transferred our call to another employee. When I repeated my question about butter spray I heard him ask someone else in the restaurant: “Is there butter on the potatoes?” We corrected him and again he put us on hold. He returned saying butter (not butter spray) was used on the potatoes but a guest can request that it be left off.

Given the differences between the six Mellow Mushroom locations which we contacted, The Vegetarian Resource Group recommends that before ordering, diners ask to speak to the general and/or the kitchen manager about menu items in order to determine how they are prepared at a particular location. Ask to see a list of ingredients if possible.

Note: “natural butter flavor” may or may not be derived from dairy butter. You must contact the company which manufactured the product containing it to be sure. “Artificial butter flavor” is not derived from dairy butter.

Note: The allergen page at the corporate Mellow Mushroom website indicates that the Roasted Potatoes do not contain milk. http://www.nutritionix.com/mellow-mushroom/menu/special-diets/premium?allergens=milk

The contents of this posting, our website, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group research, donate at www.vrg.org/donate

Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

Information on additional restaurant chains is at http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

You can find vegetarian and vegan restaurants in the U.S. and Canada here.
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

pexels-photo-59196

Bullying: When you’re a Vegetarian or Vegan Teen
by Shannon Borgoyn

Being a teen can be hard: trying to figure out who you are and what you want to do with your life are big tasks. On top of this, deciding to go vegetarian or vegan can add another level of difficulty to the game of life. According to their 2014 online national poll, Harris Poll (for The Vegetarian Resource Group) found that 4% of young Americans aged 8-18 are vegetarian (including vegan). This will most likely grow as young people discover vegetarianism and veganism. Regardless of vegetarianism’s and veganism’s growth, not all people know what it is or understand it. Meat has always been considered the focal point of most western dishes. So, it can be hard for most people to wrap their minds around having all-plant dishes. Because of this, people may be curious, guilty, or aggressive when faced with vegetarians or vegans.

I am a vegan. In my experience, people have been open-minded and genuinely curious about my lifestyle. They ask: “How hard is it? Where do you get your protein? What do you eat?” In high school, I was vegetarian and this was usually the case for me: people were curious because they didn’t know about my lifestyle. However, I’ve also experienced people who aren’t so open-minded. I’ve encountered some of these people in real life. I took cooking classes in high school, so my lifestyle was quickly noted. While many people were supportive, I felt left out when the non-vegetarian majority chose the meals we prepared, which were not vegetarian-friendly. Also, I have had negative online experiences. There are people (“trolls”) who purposely say things to get a response and feed off of it. In my case, they try to “weed out the vegan” or comment purposely vegan-offensive things to get vegans to respond (usually negatively). These types of situations can be very tough to handle and it can be hard to know how to respond.

To get an idea of others’ experiences, I interviewed VRG interns: Casey Brown and Davin Sims. Casey was vegetarian in high school and became vegan in college. When asked about her loved ones’ responses to her decision, she replied that “everyone was fine” and that it “didn’t ever come up” in conversation. She said that the people in her life are “really open and supportive” about her lifestyle.
Davin ate meat for her first two years in high school and transitioned to veganism in her last two years. Because of the change in her lifestyle Davin lost much weight. People noticed, commented, and were curious about her lifestyle change. Davin said that this was contrary to what she thought would happen. Davin attended an inner-city public high school and knew that people who changed weren’t always “well-received.” These changes included dietary changes. So, she was surprised to find out that this wasn’t the case for her. Because of veganism, she was able to make new friends. In college, Davin started a vegan and vegetarian outreach club to provide foods for vegan and vegetarian students. Some people in the club who knew Davin as vegan didn’t respect or accept her decision to stop being totally vegan at school (due to limited vegan food available), though she was still vegetarian.
VRG volunteer coordinator Brigette Dumais weighed in on her high school experiences. She said she was vegetarian in high school for one year. When she “stopped eating meat,” she found it to be “a struggle” because she was “made fun of.” Additionally, she felt left out when eating with non-vegetarian people. The experience she recalled to me most vividly was when she was involved in band. The band’s bus had stopped at a McDonald’s for food. Brigette was unprepared because she hadn’t brought any food with her. Additionally, she felt like she had to “choose between being hungry and eating meat.” She also recalled another experience with a family member not accepting that she considered fish to be a meat. When Brigette became vegan after college, reception from her partner was easy, since they did it together and he did the cooking. There was no negativity from her friends or family, but more curiosity and questions because of lack of knowledge.
When people are purposely insensitive or hurtful towards you, one course of action is stand your ground and believe in your decision. If they attempt to question or mislead you, keep firm and reply calmly (but firmly) that this is who you are and you’re not going to change. If you have gathered enough information, you should be able to calmly and confidently respond in a way comfortable for you.

It is good if you have friends with you who support and understand your choice; they can stand with you against the bully. It may be helpful for you to join or form a vegetarian support group. If this isn’t the choice for you, you can always ignore the bully. Some bullies are fueled by attention and will stop bothering you when you ignore them. Don’t be a bully back to them; being mean only makes them meaner and things can get out of hand. If the situation escalates, it might help to go to an adult or teacher you trust.

Sources:
https://www.stopbullying.gov/what-is-bullying/
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-02/vegetarians-vegans-hated-bullied-australia-richard-cornish/7680900
https://theveganmom.com/2010/11/12/vegan-kids-bullying-is-it-a-problem/
http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/Polls/2016_adults_veg.htm
http://www.vrg.org/blog/2014/05/30/how-many-teens-and-other-youth-are-vegetarian-and-vegan-the-vegetarian-resource-group-asks-in-a-2014-national-poll/
http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/bullies.html

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

okja-tilda-swinton

A new Netflix original movie titled Okja was premiered at the Cannes Film Festival this year. Okja is about a young South Korean girl named Mija whose pet (a fictitious super pig species that resembles a hippo) is kidnapped by an industry who wants to slaughter the animal. The film follows the girl on her journey to save her beloved pet from the meat industry.

Okja will be released on Netflix on June 28, 2017, where you can watch it here. Share with friends and plan a movie night to watch the film’s Netflix debut! https://www.netflix.com/title/80091936

Here is the trailer:
http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/vegan-film-coming-to-netflix-from-cannes/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Friends

Vegetarian Resource Group member Karen Peissinger did a veggie booth at the Quaker Spring Gathering in Painted Post, New York. The photo shows the presentation/display Betsy Root put together for the event. VRG provided some handouts for this outreach.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Brussels Sprouts at Cruciferous in LA

Brussels Sprouts at Cruciferous in LA

The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Cienfuegos
95 Ave. A
New York, NY 10009
Cienfuegos serves vegan versions of classic Cuban meals. Many folks enjoy the Mushroom & Tomatillo Croquetas and the Cuban Sliders. Happy hour is from 5pm-7pm daily. Live Latin Jazz music is performed from 7pm-10pm on Mondays.

Cruciferous
1253 Vine St. #8
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Cruciferous serves family style dishes. All their pastas are made from scratch. General Tso’s Brussels Sprouts and Potato Gnocchi are popular menu items. 20% gratuity is included in your bill.

Farmacy Vegan Kitchen and Bakery
803 N Tampa St.
Tampa, FL 33602
Farmacy Vegan Kitchen and Bakery is located inside the Duckweed Urban Grocery store. They offer juices and smoothies, bowls, baked goods, and wraps. Sample items include Marinated Kale Salad, Spanish Lentil Soup, and BBQ Black Bean Meatballs. They also have gluten-free options.

Majani Restaurant
7167 S. Exchange Ave.
Chicago, IL 60649
Enjoy vegan soulfood dishes including a Po Boy sandwich, black eyed pea burger, and black eyed pea tacos.

Taqueria La Venganza
Location varies (pop-ups)
Oakland, CA
Taqueria la Venganza does “pop-ups” around Oakland and the Bay Area. Check their website for hours and locations, as they vary daily. “Carne Asada” tacos and Chorizo are a few examples of Taqueria la Venganza’s veganized Mexican cuisine.

Taste
236 Bridge St.
Phoenixville, PA 19460
Taste is a wine bar that offers small vegan appetizers and plates. They have truly unique menu items including lavender popcorn, fancy cheeses, and desserts such as the milkshake cupcake. Taste offers private wine-tasting parties. Call in advance to book your reservation for private tastings.

The Cookie Counter
7415 Greenwood Ave. North
Seattle, WA 98103
Vanilla, Mint Chip, Chocolate, and Strawberry vegan ice cream is always available. Additionally there are flavors that rotate weekly and seasonally, including Blackberry Lemon, Roasted Peach, and Strawberry Rhubarb. You can place special /bulk orders online at https://www.seattlecookiecounter.com/vw-ice-cream-truck The Cookie Counter has a weekly ice cream truck! See https://www.seattlecookiecounter.com/vw-ice-cream-truck for the schedule. The truck is also available for catering. The Cookie Counter has gluten free cone options.

Truce
526 Selby Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55102
Whether you’re looking to revitalize your body after a workout or you just want a fresh-tasting drink after a long day, Truce is a solid option to check out for the best all-organic freshly produced juicy goodness. Make sure to try the Glow Greens juice which includes the unusually tasty ingredient, dandelion greens, along with grapefruit, pear, cucumber, romaine, parsley, and orange.

Under the Sun
244 E. 3rd St.
Long Beach, CA 90802
Whether or not you are vegan, vegetarian or even a meat eater this place will open your mind up to a raw food frenzy. With two different menus to provide living foods and juice tonics this restaurant is making its mark in the plant based community. Under the Sun offers positive spin offs to a lot of America’s most loved meals while also introducing different cultural medicines in the form of tonics and infused meals such as the Tu-Nah wrap and the LBC sandwich. Along with its desserts like Cheezecake Slice and Doh! Nut Bites any first timer with definitely be a lifelong returner.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

lDEqyz_Y

Earth Island (manufacturer of Follow Your Heart Products) has been Awarded Gold Level Zero Waste Certification

The Vegetarian Resource Group received the following information from Earth Island. Congratulations!

On behalf of Follow Your Heart, we are very excited to share with you that Earth Island, the manufacturing facility for Follow Your Heart products, has been awarded Gold Level Zero Waste certification from Green Business Certification Incorporated (GBCI), making Earth Island the first plant-based food manufacturing facility in the U.S. to achieve such a title. Earth Island earned the Zero Waste Gold status by diverting 97% of its waste from the landfill as well as fulfilling additional green initiatives over the past 12 months.

In order to achieve Gold Level Zero Waste certification, Earth Island met a strict set of guidelines outlined by GBCI which includes diverting at least 90% of overall waste from landfills and implementing a comprehensive program to reduce and divert waste through strategic purchasing, material reuse, composting, increased recycling, and employee education. Earth Island analyzed every aspect of its operation to classify and quantify all sources of its waste and then identify where waste could either be reduced through increased recycling or composting, or eliminated through reusing materials. Through their efforts, Earth Island diverted nearly 100 tons to recycling, composted 136 tons, and re-purposed 228 tons of materials.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

pittsburgh

Join us for our first Vegan Night in Pittsburgh at the Pirates VS Orioles game

Starting at $87.06 per person* Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Contact ?Donna ?at Green Earth Travel for more information
?donna@greenearthtravel.com? or call 301 229-5666

Take me out to the ball game!
Take me out with the crowd
Buy me some peanuts and crackerjacks
I don’t care if I never get back

Join the Pirates, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh, vegan enthusiasts, and all animal lovers for our first Vegan Night!
Join us for one night in Pittsburgh for a Pirates VS Orioles game,
A historical event as this is the first game ever to block seats off for vegans!
We will stay at the SpringHill Suites Marriott,
1 ticket per person and vegan breakfast the next morning (breakfast is not included in price)

*Cost per person double occupancy $127.98
Single occupancy $209.66
Triple occupancy $100.75 per person
Quad occupancy $87.06 per person
We can get up to six people in a room so please email directly for price.

Price includes:
1 night hotel at the SpringHill Suites Marriott
Hotel taxes
1 ticket to the game
Vegan dinner and appetizer
Each ticket includes access to the exclusive Vegan Menu in the Picnic Park from 5:30 – 7 p.m. and a Corner Box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game.

What is not included:
Gratuities to the hotel staff
Parking $25
Optional vegan breakfast.

Menu includes:
Pretzels, Chips and Dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with Local PA maple mustard)
Power Chop Salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing)
Ultimate Vegan Burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun)
Buffalo Cauliflower (vegan ranch dipping sauce)
Sweet Potato Tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla)
Watermelon and Berries

No refunds on baseball tickets.
$50 cancellation fee for the room until September 3rd
September 4th-no refunds

Contact Donna at Green Earth Travel for more information
donna@greenearthtravel.com or call 301 229-5666

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

logo_grimaldis

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

The VRG received an email from a reader who asked “…if there was any information on mozzarella cheese used at Grimaldi’s Coal Brick-Oven Pizzeria.” See: https://www.grimaldispizzeria.com/

Our reader told us that he had dined at the Cedar Hill, Texas Grimaldi’s where “the manager said there was no animal rennet in the mozzarella cheese.”
Ingredient listings do not appear on the company’s website. So in April 2017 The Vegetarian REsoruce Group placed an unofficial call to Grimaldi’s corporate office requesting this information and left a voicemail.

The next day we received a call back from Nina at Grimaldi’s corporate office. She told us that “there is no animal rennet in the mozzarella cheese used on the Garden Pizza.” Nina added that “the Romano-Spice Blend which is sprinkled on top does contain animal rennet.”

The Garden Pizza is described on their website as being Grimaldi’s “Traditional Pizza topped with fresh Roma tomatoes, sliced onions, mushrooms and black olives.”

We also asked Nina if the dough conditioner L-cysteine, which is most often derived from poultry feathers, was used to make their dough. She said “L-cysteine is not in our dough.” We also asked about lard and she again said “No lard.”

Lacking a formal statement from Grimaldi’s about their vegan menu items, we sought to confirm all of the information that we had gathered above. So The VRG placed several random calls to Grimaldi’s restaurants in Arizona, California and Colorado. Managers at four Grimaldi’s locations confirmed all of the preceding information.

We also learned that the Romano-Spice Blend is “automatically put on pizzas. When ordering, customers should request that it be left off.”
According to all four managers at various Grimaldi’s locations, butter is not used on the pizza crust. The pizza sauce is “all-vegetable” with no meat, meat flavors nor dairy.

They told us that vegans could order the Garden Pizza without the cheese.

The VRG also inquired about the Kale Chopped Salad which is described on the menu as consisting of “kale, romaine lettuce, artichokes, cucumber, red onion, shaved Italian cheese, sun-dried tomatoes and Kalamata olives tossed in a lemon vinaigrette.”

The four managers with whom we spoke unanimously agreed that the Kale Chopped Salad “could be ordered without the cheese.” All four put us on hold while they checked into the lemon vinaigrette ingredients. All relayed to us after a brief pause that there was neither honey nor dairy in the lemon vinaigrette. One manager mentioned that a guest could always request “oil and vinegar on the side.”

For information about other restaurant chains, see http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

For information about vegetarian and vegan restaurants, see http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group research, donate at www.vrg.org/donate

To join, go to http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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My name is Alyssa Ardolino. I am one of the University of Maryland College Park Dietetic Interns this year. I wanted to let you know I wrote a blog post about Vegan and Vegetarian diets and our experience at The Vegetarian Resource Group for our dietetic internship blog. You can read it here:

http://umdieteticinternship.blogspot.com/2017/05/is-veganism-right-for-you-our-visit-to.html

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Do you love your dad and want to make sure he stays healthy? If so, why not consider giving him a vegan cookbook for Father’s Day. The Vegetarian Resource Group Book Catalog offers several books that your father might enjoy:

Grills Gone Vegan_low res

Grills Gone Vegan

This book gives instructions for both outdoor and indoor grills. Apartment dwellers now can enjoy grilled vegan cuisine, too! Chapter 1 offers helpful information for those that are new to grilling. The last chapter of the book includes recipes for marinades and other condiments.

Next, dive into all the wonderful recipes. Starters include Roasted Garlic, Cajun Mushrooms, Stuffed Jalapeño Chiles, and Grilled Baby Artichokes. You can prepare side dishes including Mexican Slaw, Ethiopian Bean Skillet, or Asian Sesame Noodles. Be sure to move on to Soups and Sandwiches including Roasted Corn Chowder and Teriyaki Portobello Burgers. Some main dishes offered are Red-Eye Tofu Steaks, Seitan Ribz, Quinoa-Stuffed Poblanos, Broccoli and Cheeze Calzones, and Porcini and Sausage Paella. Finally, don’t forget to prepare dessert over a grill. Enjoy Maple-Glazed Grapefruit or Pineapple and Pomegranate Couscous Cakes.

Teff Love

Perhaps your dad likes trying new dishes. Vegan Ethiopian food is delicious and now your father can use Teff Love to prepare this cuisine at home. First, you’ll find a recipe to make injera (Ethiopan bread). For breakfast you can prepare Ye’shimbra Duket Kita (Savory Chickpea-Flour Pancakes) or Ye’beqolo Genfo (Creamy, Cheesy Corn Grits with a Spicy Seasoned-Oil Drizzle). Another chapter features spicy red sauces and stews including Ye’Atakilt Wot (Potatoes, Carrots, and Cauliflower in a Spicy Sauce), Ye’misser Wot (Red Lentils in a Spicy Sauce). If you don’t like spicy food, one chapter highlights mild sauces and stews including Ye’Ater Kik Alicha (Split Peas in a Mild Sauce) and Ye’atakilt Alicha (Stewed Cabbage, Potatoes and Carrots in a Mild Sauce). The section on cooked vegetables and casseroles offers Ye’Abesha Gomen (Tender Stewed Collard Greens) and Ye’Zelbo Gomen Be’Karot (Tender Kale with Carrots, Onion, and Mild Spices). You’ll also find cold dishes including Ye’Kaysir Atakilt (A Salad of Tender Roasted Beets and Fresh Herbs in a Citrus Dressing) and Azifa (Tangy Lentil Salad). Finally, a section on beverages and sweets includes Telba (A Roasted-Flaxseed Shake) and Mocha Teff Brownies.

Vegan Brunch

Perhaps your father likes preparing brunch on weekends. Inside you’ll discover more than 176 inspired recipes for seasonal favorites, along with beautiful color photographs, including:

• Banana Flapjacks
• Classic Broccoli Quiche
• Puttanesca Scramble
• Cherry Sage Sausages
• Gingerbread Waffles with Carmelized Figs
• Biscuits and Smoked Almond Gravy
• Lemon Cashew Crepes
• East Coast Coffee Cake
• Tomato Rosemary Scones
• Bakery-Style Berry Muffins

The VRG Book Catalog offers many other creative vegan cookbooks. To order a gift for your dad, visit:
VRG Book Catalog

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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To see a list of ten vegan friendly ballparks, see:
http://www.peta.org/features/peta-top-10-vegan-friendly-ballparks/

Holding the Oriole park vegan dog is editor Samantha Gendler.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Vegetarian Resource Group is once again sponsoring a video contest. We will be awarding one $200 scholarship plus two $100 awards. The deadline for entries this year is July 15, 2017.

Create and submit a video relating what you want to tell others about veganism. Some possible topics: food, nutrition, your feelings about veganism and/or vegetarianism, water usage and veganism, veganism and animal rights, or other veggie topics which appeal to you. Humor and feelings are appreciated. All videos should be positive, not be critical of anyone, and not include any footage of animal cruelty. You may submit a video you have already made.

Aspects of judging include accuracy and judges wanting to share the video with others. Entrants give permission to The Vegetarian Resource Group to post and share the video, to link to and from the video, and share the video with the media.

To see the video contest rules, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/videoscholarship.php

Previous wining videos can be found here:
http://www.vrg.org/veg_videos.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Each issue of Vegetarian Journal has a column called Vegetarian Action. Here we feature individuals that have been promoting veganism in many different ways. The latest issue of Vegetarian Journal takes a look at the terrific work Vesanto Melina has been doing for decades.

VRG Intern Casey Brown interviewed Vesanto and states, “Among the many professions Melina has held throughout her life, she has found time to co-author 10 books, including Becoming Vegan, Cooking Vegan, and Becoming Raw. She has worked with co-author and Registered Dietitian Brenda Davis for the past 23 years. Their books are widely available in numerous languages, and both the comprehensive and express editions of Becoming Vegan have been recognized for multiple awards. These books are essential to health professionals and everyone else hoping to learn more about nutrition on a plant-based diet. While they have received strong support and recognition for these books, they have also faced opposition. Following the release of their first book, Becoming Vegetarian in 1994, a 45-page booklet was written in opposition to their publication. Luckily, they were able to counter this booklet and as a result, they ended up with even better book sales! Davis and Melina currently teach courses on vegan nutrition, which are available in California and online.”

You can read the complete article here: http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2017issue2/2017_issue2_vegetarian_action.php

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, go to:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Have you ever wondered how much water is used to make a vegan burrito versus a meat-based burrito? Figuring out the answer to this question is not as easy as you might think. VRG Research Director Jeanne Yacoubou, MS, spent a lot of time investigating this topic and shares her findings in the recent issue of Vegetarian Journal.

The article can be read here:
Burrito on My Plate: The Water Footprint of a Vegan Versus a Meat Burrito

And here is a one page infographic comparing how much water is needed to produce a Vegan Burrito without Tofu, a Vegan Burrito with Tofu, and a Beef Burrito:
http://www.vrg.org/environment/BurritoOnMyPlate.pdf

To support research such as this, consider donating to The Vegetarian Resource Group at:
Donate to VRG

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Each issue of Vegetarian Journal has a column called Veggie Bits. Here we review vegan products that we think readers would want to know about.

We reviewed these items:
Rigoni di Asiago’s Hazelnut Spread
Pure Genius Brownies (40 percent made from chickpeas!)
Back to the Roots Cereals
Hippies Organic Chickpea Puffs
Sabra Spreads (packaged in squeeze bottles!)
Yuve Protein (Chia Seeds and Cocoa flavor)
Edward & Sons (Let’s Do…Organic) Banana Flour and Heavy Coconut Cream

Click here to read the most recent Veggie Bits!

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, see:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Two Vegetarian Resource Group interns (Casey Brown and Sasha Keenan) spent several weeks comparing vegan cheeses sold today. This was a huge project and the recent issue of Vegetarian Journal shared some of their findings. See: Guide to Vegan Cheese

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The authors state: “Generally speaking, non-dairy cheeses contain no cholesterol and are lower in saturated fat than dairy cheeses. Non-dairy cheeses are a reduced fat alternative to dairy cheeses. For example, a slice (19 grams) of Go Veggie brand Vegan Cheddar Slices contains 35 calories, 1 gram of protein, 2 grams of fat, 5 grams of carbohydrates, and 0 grams of saturated fat, while a slice (21 grams) of Kraft Deli Deluxe Cheese for comparison contains 70 calories, 4 grams of protein, 6 grams of fat, 0 grams of carbohydrates, and 3.5 grams of saturated fat.”

Due to space constraints in the magazine, we also have a more thorough version of this article on our website. To see a complete list of vegan cheese brands and purchasing options, as well as characteristics of the various vegan cheese brands and more comparison tables, visit: http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/Public/VeganCheese2016.pdf

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, see:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

To support our internship program, consider donating to The Vegetarian Resource Group at: Donate to VRG

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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In the recent issue of Vegetarian Journal, Mary Finelli shares information on the plight of fish. She mentions “Fishes are far more sentient and perceptive than most people realize or, until recently, than even science has credited them with being. They have complex social interactions and can recognize other fishes by subtle facial markings. They can also differentiate human faces from one another. They learn by watching others and pass knowledge from generation to generation, which is the basis of culture. There are fishes who use tools, which scientists consider to be a sophisticated behavior. Some fishes are known to communicate and cooperate with other species. There are fishes who build nests for their young, vigilantly caring for them and valiantly protecting them. Some even incubate their babies in their mouths! These and many other characteristics are explored in the recently published book, What a Fish Knows, by Jonathan Balcombe.”

The author also states, “Fishes are, in fact, gateway animals to animal abuse. What other animals are considered not only acceptable to kill but admirable to torture? That’s what fishing is: torturing fishes. They are impaled, hauled through the water by a hook, manhandled, suffocated and/or killed in some other inhumane way. Even if released, many perish as a result of the injury and trauma they’ve suffered. It’s not a sport; the fishes are victims, not willing participants. Children are taken fishing to introduce them to nature, but instead of learning to respect it they are taught to harmfully exploit nature and are praised for abusing animals.”

If you or someone you know still eats fish, you might want to share this article on why you should not consume fish: Fishes

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The latest issue of Vegetarian Journal features an article called Portable Picnic Feasts. Here Chef Nancy Berkoff, EdD, Rd, shares many recipes including:

Salsa Five Ways (including numerous variations)
Baked Spinach Rice
Salad Niçoise
Picnic in a Bread Bowl
Seven Layered Salad in a Jar
Caesar Salad

Have a terrific Memorial Day Weekend!

Read this article here:
Portable Picnic Feasts

Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal by visiting:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

DC Greenfest_ Julia Mathew, Casey Brown, and Laneece Hurd

Recently, we had the opportunity to represent The Vegetarian Resource Group at the Green Festival in Washington D.C. This is a nationwide event that promotes green living and sustainability, and it features many exhibitors including vegan product companies and animal welfare organizations. We were pleasantly surprised by the number of vegans and vegetarians that were present at this festival. It was exciting to learn that several of these individuals were long-time members of The Vegetarian Resource Group. There were also many non-vegans who came to our table with open minds, and were ready to be educated on the many benefits of a meat-free lifestyle. They left with several copies of The VRG’s Vegetarian Journal, informative flyers and brochures, and a fresh new perspective and consideration for this lifestyle.

We both really enjoyed this event because we were able to have some great conversations about a wide variety of topics relating to veganism. We spoke with many people that were interested in transitioning to veganism or vegetarianism. Most of these individuals had similar concerns and were either not sure what to cook or how to remain healthy on a vegan/vegetarian diet. We were able to provide them with recipes found in Vegetarian Journal and our ‘Multi-Veggie Burger’ recipe card. A number of people also found our recipe books interesting, specifically our Meatless Meals for Working People cookbook, which provides simple and quick recipes that are perfect for busy lifestyles. One lady stopped by to show her friend our book, Vegan in Volume, which she used to distribute to hospitals, so they could prepare vegan options in large quantities.

In terms of health, a number of people were curious as to where vegans receive their protein. We were able to inform them of the abundance of plant protein sources and provide them with a copy of our “Veganism in a Nutshell” brochure, which lists plant sources of many common nutrients. A few parents also stopped by to learn more about vegan nutrition and cooking for their children and found the “Pediatric Manual of Clinical Dietetics” vegetarian chapter and our “Vegan Nutrition for Teenagers” brochures to be very helpful. One student stopped by and was excited to receive a copy of the Vegetarian Journal since it featured an article about being vegan in Thailand. She explained that she is going to be studying abroad in Thailand next year, so she was excited to learn more about how she could remain vegan while she was there.

Although this event was held in Washington D.C., our Baltimore Veggie Dining Guide was very popular among this crowd. Many people were interested in learning more about veg-friendly dining in the area, and we were also pleased to inform them that a complete restaurant guide, covering the U.S. and Canada, can be found on our website: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php. One family mentioned that they found our restaurant guide to be extremely helpful during their recent vacation in Colorado.

We also spoke with other organizations including individuals who held summer camps and were interested in having the VRG come speak to the kids to teach them about the benefits of a vegetarian lifestyle. As usual, children loved receiving our “I Love Animals and Broccoli” coloring books, and they were very excited that we had something fun for them. One child also picked up our “Be Kind to Animals, Don’t Eat Them” sticker, and stated that he agreed with the message. It was exciting to see future generations already being so conscious of their decisions.

We both had a great time connecting with new people and spreading the message of veganism at this event. Next, you can find us at the Central Pennsylvania Vegfest in Lancaster, PA on Saturday, June 3rd.

VRG will be at the Ft. Lauderdale Green Festival Saturday and Sunday, December 2 and 3, 2017. See: http://www.greenfestivals.org/ft-lauderdale-2017-dec-2-3.html#!ahnesti

To volunteer at The Vegetarian Resource Group booths, contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org

To support VRG outreach, donate at www.vrg.org/donate

Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Each issue of Vegetarian Journal features a column written by Reed Mangels, PhD, RD called Scientific Update. Reed summarizes recent scientific studies related to Vegan/Vegetarian diets and lifestyle. In our latest Journal, Reed reviewed studies on these topics:

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) New Position on Vegetarian Diets
Fruits and Vegetables and Depression
Vegetarian Athletes
Alternative Plant Milks
Fruits and Vegetables Don’t Overcome Red Meat
Whole Grain Benefits

To read the entire article, go to:
Scientific Update

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

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Vegetarian Resource Group

By Julia Mathew

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I originally came across the intern position at The Vegetarian Resource Group after an exhaustive online search to find an internship suitable for credit towards my Environmental & Sustainable Studies minor. I read some of the previous interns’ experiences working at The VRG and knew that it would be a good fit for me due to its diversity of responsibilities and projects, as well as its general goal of educating the public about veganism. I was also particularly interested in learning about how small businesses and non-profits work.

I interned at The VRG during the Spring 2017 semester of my senior year at Loyola University Maryland. I worked on many articles during my internship about subjects that related to my personal interests, such as traveling. I wrote various vegan city guides and reflections of my experiences as a vegan in Copenhagen, Stockholm, Helsinki, and Reykjavik, as well as a restaurant review of Hiltl in Zürich. I also wrote an article about some of my mother’s South Indian recipes and conducted an interview with a vegan chef to be published in the Vegetarian Journal.

I also helped write product reviews for various brands such as Laughing Giraffe Organics, Good Karma Foods, Munk Pack, Hodo Soy, Breyers, and Talenti. First, I contacted companies requesting samples on behalf of The VRG for the Veggie Bits section in Vegetarian Journal. Then I and others sampled the food and wrote a brief review for the successful products. I sampled many delicious vegan products such as flax milk yogurt, gyro slices, almond milk ice cream, and oatmeal squeeze packs.

Another weekly task I had was to assist in updating VRG’s online restaurant guide by researching vegan-friendly establishments within the United States and Canada. I also participated in The VRG college scholarship review process by assessing applicants’ essays, as well as reviewed video submissions for VRG’s video contest. I was given the opportunity to represent The VRG at various events through outreach booths at Leg Up Farmers Market in York, Pennsylvania, Green Festival in D.C., and Harford County Earth Day Festival in Aberdeen, Maryland.

I really enjoyed my VRG internship and learned a lot about the vegan movement both in and out of the office. I made many valuable connections with fellow vegans and activists. I turned in a portfolio for credit to my minor advisor that included most of my work for The VRG. Much to my surprise, it ended up being over 30 pages long! I never realized how much I wrote for the VRG because I was so interested in and excited to do my projects. Subsequent to my internship, I will continue to volunteer at The VRG for future events such as Central PA VegFest, the Animal Rights Conference in VA, and DC VegFest. To intern for The Vegetarian Resource Group, see:
http://www.vrg.org/student/index.php

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group internships, donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Or join The Vegetarian Resource Group at:
http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Perhaps you’ve heard about Aquafaba. The liquid you’ve been draining from your beans all these years is actually surprisingly similar to raw egg whites and can be used for baking in much the same way. The liquid can be baked, whipped to make meringue, turned into marshmallows, or used to create uncanny cheese substitutes.

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Laura McGuiness shares her experience baking with aquafaba in the recent issue of Vegetarian Journal. She explains, “Aquafaba is still largely a mystery, even to scientists. The proteins and starches in the bean juice appear to mimic the proteins in egg whites, but the exact science leaves something to be desired. What we do know from an analysis by The Norwegian Food Research Institute is that aquafaba is mainly composed of starch and proteins. Because of the high starch content, aquafaba is able to form stable gels, which may aid in its ability to emulate egg whites.”

You’ll find the following recipes in this article along with photos of some of the baked items:
Basic Meringue Cookies
Baked Alaska
Lemon Apocalypse Pie
Chocolate Mousse
Walnut Fudge
Lemon Dacquoise

The article can be found here:
Aquafabulous

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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I heard that Americans should be eating less sugar. In practical terms, what does this mean?

The Nutrition Hotline column in the latest issue of Vegetarian Journal answers the question: I heard that Americans should be eating less sugar. In practical terms, what does this mean? Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, begins her response by stating: “Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 calls for an upper limit of 10% of calories from added sugar. This limit was developed because diets high in added sugars are often associated with an increased risk of heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and colon/rectal cancer.” She also states: “In addition, sugars, even the ones we think of as “natural,” like maple syrup and agave, are worth little or nothing from a nutrition standpoint. Eating a high-sugar diet means that other more nutritious foods are being neglected.”

The entire article can be read here:
Nutrition Hotline
To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Baltimore VegFest_ Casey Brown, Marissa Thobe, Michaela Sadlowski, and Nicole Turner

By Nicole Turner

I volunteered with The Vegetarian Resource Group on May 6th, 2017, at the Baltimore VegFest and had a blast. Though the weather wasn’t the nicest, it didn’t stop people from coming out to enjoy the cruelty-free festivities. This is an annual event that is organized by The Humane League, an organization whose mission is to reduce suffering by inspiring change at all levels. Baltimore VegFest is a wonderful event that celebrates healthy, sustainable, and compassionate eating and the benefits of a vegetarian and vegan lifestyle. The event is free and includes various speakers, a wide variety of food, local veg restaurants, vegan cooking demonstrations, and free gift bags! My favorite part about the festival was having an abundance of food choices. My favorites were the vegan pizza, the mac and cheese, and Vegan Treat’s donuts and brownies! The event took place at the University of Maryland Baltimore County College Campus, so there were many students that came out to the event as well. It was great to see such a variety of ages attending the festival, from young kids to older adults. This was my first time attending Baltimore’s VegFest, and I look forward to returning next spring.

Throughout the day, I made great connections with visitors and many were interested in learning more about The VRG. I had conversations with many individuals who had health conditions and were using a plant-based diet to address their health concerns. I also had an interesting conversation with representatives from Poplar Springs Animal Sanctuary, a 400-acre non-profit refuge in Poolesville, Maryland for farm animals and wildlife. She told me about the events they have throughout the year and the importance of spreading awareness about animal cruelty. It was exciting to be around many organizations that share a similar message as The VRG.

Some of the most popular resources people gravitated towards were VRG’s “Baltimore Dining Guides”, “Veganism in A Nutshell” pamphlets, kids coloring books, and of course, the Vegetarian Journal. The local dining guides were extremely popular since a majority of the people attending the festival were from the area, and they were interested in learning more about veg-friendly restaurants in Baltimore. Many people were interested in taking a free copy of the Vegetarian Journal, which is filled with product reviews, delicious vegan recipes, health information, and more. People were also eager to take home our materials to give to friends or family that were interested in transitioning to a vegan or vegetarian diet. Many parents stopped by to learn more about how to assist their children during the transition, and we provided them with copies of our “Vegan Nutrition for Teenagers” and “Vegan Nutrition in Pregnancy” brochures.

There is something special about Baltimore VegFest. It is a tight community and so much compassion radiated from the event. It was great to share the Vegetarian Journal with so many people and tell them about The VRG and our mission. The interest level was very high, and I felt proud to be spreading awareness about such important issues. I am looking forward to next year’s event and our I hope to see you there too!
To volunteer to help at VRG booths, contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group outreach, please donate at www.vrg.org/donate
Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Conscious Fork Photo by Hannah Maxwell

Conscious Fork Photo by Hannah Maxwell

The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here: http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
www.vrg.org/donate

Conscious Fork
14 Railroad Ave.
Warwick, NY 10990
And
97 Baker St., Ste. 4
Maplewood, NJ 07040
Conscious Fork has different menus at each location, so be sure to check their website for the correct menu. They serve breakfast, lunch, and juices. There is a “build your bowl” option. Everything, except bread and croutons, is gluten-free. Almost all ingredients are organic and non-GMO.

Doe Donuts
8201 SE Powell
Portland, OR 97226
Doe is an all vegan donut shop that serves creative flavors including French Toast, Passionflower, and Thai Tea Fritter.

J. Selby’s
169 N. Victoria St.
St. Paul, MN 55104
Serving breakfast, lunch/dinner, and dessert, this new eatery is perfect for those wanting a nice sit-down meal. Try the falafel platter consisting of house-made falafel with lettuce, tomato, onion, cucumber & tzatziki sauce with pickles, fresh pita, and sprinkle of feta paired with a GuS natural soda, and a chocolate chip cookie with “soft serve n’ice cream” on top for dessert.

JaJaJa
162 E. Broadway
New York, NY 10002
JaJaJa’s “Fish” Tacos are highly recommended by yelp and Facebook reviewers. Many folks also enjoy the Empanadas.

Kahiau’s Bakery & Café
3712 S. Plaza Trail #101
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
Kahiau’s Bakery & Cafe serves Hawaiian style treats. The menu changes weekly. Gluten-free and raw options are available. You can order specialty and custom cakes. There are individual or family sized options for menu items.

Morels Café
619 Baxter Ave.
Louisville, KY 40204
Morels Cafe serves vegan deli foods that are made without using tofu or eggplant. Many patrons enjoy the Philly “Cheese Steak.” All “cheeses” are cashew based. Local Kentucky kombucha is available on tap. Be sure to get a hand made “pop-tart” for dessert!

Pancho’s Kitchen
5201 W. Charleston Blvd., Ste. 120-130
Las Vegas, NV 89146
Start your day with some chilaquiles with vegan cheese and sour cream or nosh on the huevos rancheros. If you’re more of a lunch/dinner Mexican-food junkie, head there later for your fix in the form of tacos, tamales, burritos, enchiladas, nachos and much more. There’s even vegan Horchata.

Seed to Sprout
1405 Wickapecko Dr.
Wanamassa, NJ 07712
Selections of pastries, cookies, and cakes are featured daily. Seed to Sprout serves baked goods, toast, lattes and other specialty drinks. They also offer custom cakes and cooking classes.

Tassili’s Raw Reality
1059 Ralph D Abernathy Blvd.
Atlanta, GA 30310
This raw eatery has a health-conscious menu with a lot of spice options available. Wraps can be selected to include a variety of spices and sauces. Comfort food options also sneak their way onto the menu. Choices include the Curried Plantains wrap or the Sprouted Tofu Delight. Be sure to check out the sweets and drink selection as well.

The GruB Factory
1210 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
The GruB Factory’s motto is “Whatever you like, we can do it vegan!” In a relaxed atmosphere, they offer cashew cream smoothies, vegan chicken boxes, French toast, tacos, and more! They are located near the University of Baltimore.

The Juice Pharm
208 E. 1st St.
Duluth, NM 55802
In addition to juices, The Juice Pharm offers vegan food. They serve bowls, toast, and tacos.

Universal Love
4622 N. Main St.
Columbia, SC 29203
Universal Love serves vegan cafe food. Couple your meal with a delicious juice or smoothie. Menu items include BBQ “chicken” and vegan tacos!

Vibe Organic Kitchen and Juice
1000 Bristol St. North
Newport Beach, CA 92660
Vibe Organic Kitchen and Juice serves juices, smoothies, breakfast, bowls, burgers, and sides. All menu items are gluten-free. Vibe also has a kids menu.

Vicecream
6550 Comanche Trail #109
Austin, TX 78732
Vicecream serves six ice cream flavors, soft serve, sundaes, shakes, and splits! There is a large selection of vegan toppings, including cookies and brownies, to pair with your ice cream.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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The Grub Factory, 1210 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201; (443) 602-7018

Enjoy Vegan Soul food at this new restaurant. The GruB Factory’s motto is “Whatever you like, we can do it vegan!” In a relaxed atmosphere, they offer cashew cream smoothies, vegan chicken boxes, French toast, tacos, and more! They are located near the University of Baltimore.

Open daily for breakfast, lunch, and early dinner. Counter service, vegan options, take-out,
VISA/MC/AMEX/DISC, $

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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My name is Laura, and I am the Special Services Director for OCEAN (Organization for Cultural Exchange Among Nations), which is a non-profit organization that sponsors foreign exchange students, ages 15-18, and places them in volunteer host families and high schools throughout the U.S. for a semester or academic year. We are currently seeking a volunteer host family for a young man from Spain who is a vegetarian and would like to live with a host family who follows similar dietary practices. We are therefore seeking a host family for him who would be able to accommodate his request. This can be anywhere in the United States.

Student’s Name: ALEX
Age upon Arrival in the U.S.: 16
Home Country: SPAIN
Grade of Enrollment: 12th
Interests: Soccer, basketball. He is interested in learning to play American football.
Please feel free to visit our website at www.ocean-intl.org for more information. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me via e-mail (info@ocean-intl.org) or by phone at 1-888-996-2326, Ext. 5. Thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
Laura
Special Services Director

OCEAN
2101 E. Broadway Road, Suite 6
Tempe, AZ 85282-1735
Phone: (480) 907-7285 Fax: (480) 907-7526
Toll-Free: 1-888-996-2326
Website: www.ocean-intl.org
E-mail: LStahl@ocean-intl.org

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

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Vegetarian Resource Group

Me-and-the-Bird-Os-event-2015

Hey, sports fans! I’m Heather Moore, the new volunteer Veggie Happy Manager for the Baltimore Orioles. I’ve been following the O’s my whole life, and I think they’ve been “following” me, too—although that’s probably just a coincidence. I was born in B’more, and I moved to Norfolk, Virginia, with PETA, the organization where I now work, in 1996. Soon after that, the O’s announced that their Triple-A team was going to play in Norfolk, about 10 minutes from my apartment. Years later, when I was considering moving to Sarasota, Florida, the O’s announced that they were going to hold Spring Training at Ed Smith Stadium, which happens to be about 10 minutes from the house I ended up buying. Clearly, I was meant to get Spring Training season tickets.

Since I’ve been vegan for 25 years, I’m just as interested in the options in the concession stands as I am in the action on the field. To continue reading, go to:
http://www.veggiehappy.com/wp/2017/05/o-so-exciting-news-vh-manager-guest-post/

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS
Natures Hampers is a family-owned and -operated business specializing in all-natural and cruelty-free vegetarian and vegan gift baskets and hampers perfect for picnics in the park, special occasions, and holidays. There are four main categories of hampers to choose from: traditional (ex. chocolate, tea, snacks); beer & wine; activity (ex., gardening, golf) and pamper (bath & body products). Natures Hampers also offers discounts and branding to corporate clients. Owner Jayne Morris relayed to us by email in April 2017:

“We are a vegetarian, family-run business and corporate friends of the Vegetarian Society [of the UK], although we do try to be vegan as much as possible. If you look at our website, www.natureshampers.com, we specialise in hampers that are packed with good and tasty food and drink, and that are a bit of a treat, too! We are always searching for new, interesting and artisan products.

We offer a range of beauty/toiletry hampers with products that use natural oils and scents. We don’t use any products tested on animals.”
Wanting to know more about Natures Hampers, The VRG asked Jayne the following questions. Here is what we learned:

Q: How long have you been open for business?
A: We have been selling hampers for about two years.

Q: Do you have a brick & mortar store?
A: We are online only and operate from a farm in East Sussex, England.

Q: What’s the difference between a basket and a hamper?
A: A hamper in the UK has two meanings: one is laundry and the other is a “picnic hamper.” A basket is a hamper without a lid, but we do use various containers.

Q: Do you have a vegan best seller?
A: Our vegan hampers are generally good sellers. There is a big movement here at the moment to not eat meat or to eat it seldom. Also there is a lot of conversation amongst the community (doctors, public, etc.) about how good for you it is.

Q. How helpful is the Vegetarian Society label in generating interest and/or sales?
A: The Vegetarian Society is helpful, and usually runs the occasional piece/comment if they are writing about gifts…

Q: Are all of your baskets/hampers vegetarian or vegan?
A: Our website is entirely vegetarian. I am a vegetarian (almost vegan) as are most of my family.

Q: Do you ship to the United States?
A: We are not able to sell directly to the USA market because of the various shipping and customs restrictions…although…our hampers can be purchased on Ebay in the US: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=natures+hampers&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.X%22natures+hampers%22.TRS0&_nkw=%22natures+hampers%22&_sacat=0

Q: What percentage of your products are American made?
A: We only buy a couple of products from the US. We try to source locally, so as to be as environmentally friendly as possible.

For information about other mail order sources in the USA and other locations, see:
http://www.vrg.org/links/products.htm#retailer

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

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Who would think? L’oreal recently had a coupon in the Sunday newspaper for EverCreme Deep Nourish Conditioner, which they stated in the ad was vegan. On their website, they indicate: *No animal derived ingredients or by-products. Formula not tested on animals.

For a list of cruelty-free mail order companies which carry cosmetics, personal care items, and other products, see:
http://www.vrg.org/links/products.htm#retailer

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

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Vegetarian Resource Group

crowd 5 (1)

Green Festival® is a vibrant, dynamic marketplace where companies and organizations come to showcase their green products and services, and where people go to learn how to live healthier, more sustainable lives.

Green Festival offers something for everyone, with the widest selection of products and services to work green, play green and live green from food, fashion and health to energy, construction and design. People can shop and enjoy vegan, vegetarian, organic foods, hands-on demos, educational activities and inspirational speakers.

Come see The Vegetarian Resource Group at the DC GreenFest show and you will receive $5.00 off your ticket when buying tickets using the code XDC17798D here:
https://www.greenfestivals.org/washington-d-c-2017-may-12-14.html#!014

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

PretStar

On their website, Pret names these items as vegan:

Miso Sweet Potato Banh Mi, Asian Greens Veggie Pot, Chipotle Corn & Avo Veggie Pot,
Chakalaka Wrap, Asian Tofu Sushi Salad, Turmeric Tofu Balance Box, Mediterranean
Mezze Salad, Spicy Black Bean and Mango Wrap, Carrot Turmeric Soup, and Almond Matcha Latte

For more information, see https://www.pret.com/en-us/not-just-for-veggies

There are Prets in Boston, Chicago, New York City, and Washington DC.

For information about eating at other restaurant chains, see:
http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

To find vegetarian and vegan restaurants, go to:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications,
including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal
medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified
health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient
information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure
about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and
mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a
product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or
confirmation on your own.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

PretStar

On their website, Pret names these items as vegan:

Miso Sweet Potato Banh Mi, Asian Greens Veggie Pot, Chipotle Corn & Avo Veggie Pot,
Chakalaka Wrap, Asian Tofu Sushi Salad, Turmeric Tofu Balance Box, Mediterranean
Mezze Salad, Spicy Black Bean and Mango Wrap, Carrot Turmeric Soup, and Almond Matcha Latte

For more information, see https://www.pret.com/en-us/not-just-for-veggies

There are Prets in Boston, Chicago, New York City, and Washington DC.

For information about eating at other restaurant chains, see:
http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

To find vegetarian and vegan restaurants, go to:
http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications,
including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal
medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified
health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient
information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure
about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and
mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a
product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or
confirmation on your own.

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

cinco de mayo

In a previous issue of Vegetarian Journal, we featured an article titled “A Cinco de Mayo Festival,” by Nanette Blanchard. Recipes include:

Jicama and Orange Salad
Sopa de Pasta
Calabacitas (squash)
Green Chilies Stuffed with Frijoles (beans)
Red Chili Sauce
Easy Capirotada (bread pudding)

See the entire article here: Cinco de Mayo Festival

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

Casey Brown and Matt Baker at Good Health Festival in Baltimore

By Casey Brown, VRG Intern
Paul’s Place is an organization located in southwest Baltimore that serves its community, providing programs and services to empower and support individuals. These include a soup kitchen, food pantry, programs designed for the youth, and health and wellness programs that provide many benefits to this community. Paul’s Place also holds an annual Spring into Good Health Festival, which invites local health organizations to the area. People visiting the festival can hear about these beneficial programs or take part in fun activities like yoga or zumba to support their health.
It was my first time visiting this festival, and I was looking forward to it since the other VRG volunteer told me that it had been fun in the previous years. He said the people tended to be receptive to and supportive of our message. I definitely noticed this, as many people recognized our booth and were excited to pick up another copy of Vegetarian Journal. Everybody was so friendly, and many people expressed their interest in going vegetarian or vegan.

We were able to have great conversations with these individuals and address many of their concerns. Numerous people were interested in reducing their consumption of animal products for the health benefits. They found our “Heart Healthy Eating Tips” and “Veganism in a Nutshell” brochures to be especially helpful for addressing their concerns. Others expressed that they had been wanting to move towards a vegetarian lifestyle, but they were having trouble thinking of meal ideas. We were able to share some of our favorite recipes with them, as well as provide them with a copy of Vegetarian Journal, which contains many vegan recipes. They were also interested in signing up for our monthly newsletter, so they could receive additional recipes online.

One man described how he was having trouble finding a good replacement for vegan cheese, but he had given up all other animal products. We shared our favorite vegan cheese brands and discussed some of the stores in the area that might sell these products. He is hoping to find a good replacement, so he can officially remove dairy from his diet. A lady told us that she used to be vegetarian, and she felt much better when she was eating this way. She was planning to go back to vegetarianism, and she was glad she could pick up many of our different resources to help get her started again.

In addition to the conversations we had, we also had many children visit the booth with their parents. They were all excited when they found out we had something fun for them too – “I love Animals and Broccoli” coloring books! While we met with a lot of people interested in the lifestyle, we did meet multiple people who were already vegetarian or vegan. It was really exciting to hear their stories and learn about the reasons and documentaries that inspired their decision.
We informed multiple people that we would also be at Baltimore Vegfest next weekend at the University of Maryland Baltimore County campus.

To volunteer to help at other VRG outreach booths, contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org

To support Vegetarian Resource Group education, donate at www.vrg.org/donate

Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/cabdacae.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group

Vegetarian Resource Group

buttercream-frosting

Are you looking for tips on how to decorate vegan cakes this holiday season? If so, we have you covered. In the latest issue of Vegetarian Journal, Laura McGuiness step by step shows you how to make vegan fillings, frostings, and other decorative items. Vegan recipes include Cream Cheese Frosting, Royal Icing, Custard Filling, Basic Buttercream, Strawberry Filling, and Lemon Buttercream. Start baking today!

The complete article can be read here:
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2016issue4/2016_issue4_vegan_cake.php

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Source: The Vegetarian Resource Group